Toolbox

CHERRIES is piloting a new RRI driven participatory approach to shape territorial R&I policies in the healthcare sector.

The CHERRIES Toolbox is aimed at providing European territories with relevant resources and guidance on how to build and replicate RRI experiments in their healthcare ecosystems.

On one side the Toolbox– together with other activities –  supports the design and implementation of the territorial experiments, on the other side it enables the capacity building of territorial stakeholders preparing them for the RRI based demand articulation, experimentation and co-creation process within the three regions.

Download the full CHERRIES toolbox here: D3.1 RRI & Experiment Toolbox.

The tools and resources of the two parts of the toolbox will be directly available on the website too.

RRI in Healthcare

Are you interested in discovering available resources and best practices in RRI in healthcare sector?

This area of the toolbox presents a set of RRI tools that enable stakeholders and territorial partners to successfully implement the experiments. This knowledge base contains promising practices for adapting RRI based routines in and between organisations. Based on a screening and selection of promising practises, the toolbox will incorporate existing resources from EU-funded as well as national-funded projects and activities on the RRI, RIS3 and healthcare interface

Pilot toolkit

Are you considering replicating the CHERRIES methodology in your region?

This area of the toolbox provides practical information and guides, helping territorial partner organisations and stakeholders to conduct the experiments.

Section A

Framing (and setting) the scene for RRI and demand-driven innovation pilots in health

Section A1

Mapping territorial ecosystems

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The fourth episode of the “CHERRIE webinar series 2020 Exploring responsible healthcare ecosystems in Europe” was devoted to a reflection on “Regional innovation ecosystems for healthcare”, with the contribution of Gaston Heimeriks (Leiden and Utrecht University) and Anett Ruszanov (ERRIN). In particular, the webinar provides an important occasion to reflect on the possible integration of RRI with Regional Innovation Smart Specialisation Strategies (RIS3) and how European Regions leverage their diversities to boost innovation.

Part of interest: The entire webinar

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

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These are the Guidelines for territorial mapping, drafted and used by CHERRIES (Deliverable D2.1) for framing the scene of the three territorial ecosystems of Örebro (Sweden), Murcia (Spain), and Cyprus (2020). Mapping policies (on innovation and research, on healthcare, on Smart Specialisation Strategies, etc) and stakeholders are of vital interest for the preparation of the three pilots. The purpose of the document is to guide territorial partners through the territorial mapping exercise in a straightforward manner. The three main sections addressed in the guidelines, namely Stakeholders’ identification and prioritisation, Gathering and screening policy instruments and strategies, and Research and Innovation Strategies for Smart Specialisation Framework, are indeed conceptually and in practical terms connected. The document describes steps by step the implementation of this complex mapping exercise. The methodology used a mixed-method ranging from desk research, expert interviews to bibliometrics indicators and networks.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

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These are three CHERRIES regional mapping reports on the territorial R&I ecosystems of Örebro (Sweden), Murcia (Spain), and Rep. Cyprus (Cyprus), set up following the mapping guidelines (see previous resource 2). In each Mapping report are presented the main findings about mapping the central actors in the territorial healthcare systems, their innovation behaviour and capabilities, priorities, needs and observable trends. Further, also insights from the analysis the policy instruments determining the innovation policy mix in each region, are provided. of CHERRIES.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

 

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The document (See SeeRRI Project, Deliverable D2.1, 2019) describes the quantitative and qualitative procedures implemented for mapping the R&I stakeholder ecosystems, aimed at including RRI in regional policies. The quantitative methodology consists of the identification of the R&I actors that are mostly active in regional research projects within the R&I ecosystems, by analysing existing R&I databases (i.e., EUPRO, PATSTAT), and then by using a ‘Quantitative Data Collection Form’. The qualitative methodology consists of the qualitative evaluation of the RRI state-of-the-art into the regional development policies and tools.

Part of interest: See in particular Chapter 2 “Methodological guidelines for mapping R&I ecosystems” and the two annexes.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Higher Education institutions, Intermediaries, CSOs, Funding organisations

 

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The document (TeRRItoria Project, Deliverable D2.1, 2019) contains indications and tools applied for mapping the territorial ecosystems of the five experiments of territorial RRI of the project. It describes the methodology and criteria adopted. It also gives a good overview of how to use observation grids and shows results achieved by using this grid technique.

Part of interest: The entire document, and in particular, Pp. 9-23 showing the methodology, observation grids and which questions to ask about stakeholders during the mapping process.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

 

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In the framework of the TeRRitoria project (Deliverable D2.2, 2019) a Map of Territorial Milieux has been developed. It contains the mapping outcomes of key societal milieu stakeholders; RRI-oriented or compatible practices and initiatives; the main “territorial policies” developed by actors at different levels of governance. The map also contains examples of “territorial factors”, i.e., social, economic, demographic and cultural risks and emerging opportunities for each of the considered territories.

Part of interest: The part of interest (Pp. 8-37) includes the summary reports of the five experiments.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Higher Education institutions, Intermediaries, CSOs, Funding organisations

 

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The SISCODE Toolbox aims to facilitate the design and implementation of co-creation journeys for the SISCODE laboratories, focussing on better understanding and prioritisation of the particularities of each context. Context analysis is the first and crucial starting point of co-creation and action. In particular, on this aspect, the SISCODE Toolbox contains tools and resources on how to define the challenge, the lab capabilities, and the policy environment.

Part of interest: In particular, see the section “Analyse the context”.

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs, Innovation Business, Policymakers, CSOs

 

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The document (Sörvik, & Kleibrink, 2015) gives a guideline on how to approach the mapping of innovation priorities and specialisation patterns in Europe. It is also helpful for promoting collaborations among regions. The mapping exercise is based on Eye@RIS3, an interactive open data tool that gives an overview of the envisaged RIS3 priorities of regions and countries in Europe.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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This document (TeRRItoria Project, Deliverable D3.2, 2019) is an inventory of 43 RRI Governance Innovation Practices detected in RRI projects conducted in Europe and beyond, proposing relevant and new models of RRI governance innovation practices. Four of the examined projects are dealing with healthcare issues. Many projects include an ecosystem mapping exercise functional to RRI implementation using different approaches, requiring also different levels of stakeholder engagement. One of these projects is FoTRRIS whose context mapping work is described. In particular, FoTRRIS carried out the context mapping exercise by the implementation of working groups, described, among other things, in the inventory. Another interesting project is the Interreg MARIE focused on the integration of RRI into the Smart Specialisation Strategy in 8 European regions.

Part of interest: See in particular Part 4.6, Pp. 74-88 devoted to FoTRRIS; and the part 4.11 Pp. 131-137 devoted to MARIE. See also parts 4.7 on INHERIT project on health and environment; 4.9 on Responsible Industry project on RRI in the industry; 4.11 on MARIE Interreg project on RRI and RIS3; and 4.15 EnRICH project on RRI education.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professional, Patients and civil society, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries

 

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The paper (by Larisch, Amer-Wåhlin, and Hidefjäll, 2016) contains a new method (functional dynamics approach) for analysing the wider socio-economic context and conditions for innovation processes addressing healthcare challenges in the Stockholm Region, using the functional dynamics approach to innovation systems (ISs). The analysis is based on triangulation using data from 16 in-depth interviews, two workshops, and additional documents. The analysis revealed several mechanisms blocking innovation processes such as fragmentation, lack of clear leadership, as well as insufficient involvement of patients and healthcare professionals. Furthermore, restrictive rules for collaboration with industry, reimbursement, and procurement mechanisms limit entrepreneurial experimentation, commercialisation, and the spread of innovations.

Part of interest: The entire article (and in particular the figures).

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Patients, Payers, Innovation Business, RPOs, Higher Education Institute

 

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The resource is an INNOVCARE project document (Deliverable D9.4, 2018). Scaling up refers to identifying opportunities and barriers at broad institutional scales, with the goal of changing the system that created the social problem. The report discusses possible ways to up-scale elements of integrated, person-centred, and holistic care for people with complex and/or rare conditions to other member states and other regions. The roadmaps focus on potential priority areas as well as possible next steps that can be taken towards holistic care models, improving the care situation for patients. The document describes the implementation of care holistic approach Road map in Spain, Austria, and Romania at macro, meso, and micro levels. The identification of priorities of the territories at the three levels was made also by interviews with stakeholders and expert workshops.

Part of interest: Pp. 1-8 about road mapping.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative businesse

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Cyprus is undergoing a major reform, namely the introduction of primary care driven national healthcare system. The aim of the present study (by Pallari, Samoutis, Rudd, 2020) was to assess the existing state of training, support, quality, guidelines, and infrastructure towards a better healthcare system in Cyprus. This is a mixed-methods study combining statistical data until October 2016 and workshop discussions delivered in Cyprus in November 2015.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals

 

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The document (WHO, European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, Bernal-Delgado et al., 2018) analyses the Spanish health system taking into account recent developments in organisation and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance, healthcare challenges (for example related to lifestyle and obesity). It contains also data and indicators.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers

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This is a portal of EC, OECD, and European Observatory providing country reports on Health systems and policies updated in 2019. Each country report contains: the list of the highlights on health issues ; basic data on Health; the risk factors; some data and reflections about the performance of the health system (effectiveness, accessibility, resilience), and finally the key findings.

Part of interest: To be selected for the country of interest.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers

Section A2

Actors’ mapping and analysis

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This is the stakeholder identification and involvement tool set up by CHERRIES for the stakeholder identification and analysis for the Training Workshops (Task 3.2) carried out in preparing and accompanying the process of need identification and Calls for solutions. It is suggested to use the tool by the involvement of the local territorial partners in a meeting. The tool can be very helpful not only for the identification of the stakeholders to be involved in the territorial RRI Training Workshops but also during the different phases of implementation of the pilots (co-design and preparation, implementation, sustainability, evaluation). The tool can be used for defining influence, relevance, interests, and involvement strategy for each identified stakeholder.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

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The document presents the Guidelines on how to perform a stakeholder analysis (by Schmeer, 1999). Stakeholder analysis is a process of systematically gathering and analysing qualitative information to determine whose interests should be taken into account when developing and/or implementing a policy or program. The Guidelines describe the 8 steps needed for stakeholder analysis.

Part of interest: The entire document

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Payers, Innovation Business, Providers

 

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This is a short guide of the World Health Organisation aimed at mapping potential key stakeholders in reproductive health and family planning service delivery. The guide describes the four steps of stakeholder mapping: identify stakeholders; analyse stakeholders; map relationships; prioritize the level of engagement.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Higher education institutions, Providers, Professionals, Payers, Intermediaries

 

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PPD Public-Private Dialogue is a structured engagement among an inclusive group of relevant and local stakeholders that seeks to identify, prioritise, and recommend consensus as well as fact-based based solutions to a specific need, challenge, or problem. PPDs go well beyond standard stakeholder consultation or a simple exchange of opinion. The Guide has been prepared by the World Bank with the involvement of PPD practitioners to provide them with an option for stakeholder mapping by adapting a Network Mapping (NM) method and allow them to design dialogue platform and determine the participants at the concept stage; promote dialogue, ensure that the right people are invited in the dialogue; facilitate the dialogue among different partners of the dialogue. Three are the steps in stakeholder mapping: identify the purpose of the mapping; doing stakeholder mapping using the NMmethod; stakeholder analysis. The NM method has 6 steps: frame the right question, identify the actors involved; work through the links; determine motivations, discuss levels of influence; harvest observation and possible actions. The document contains also examples of applications.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Higher education institutions, Providers, Payers

 

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This Stakeholder analysis matrix was set up by www.tools4dev.org a repository of tools to be used and adapted to different projects and initiatives. The matrix allows to collect, for each stakeholder, information about impact, influence, what is important for the stakeholder, how the stakeholders contribute to the project, how could the stakeholder block the project; and the strategy for engaging.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Higher education institutions, Providers, Payers, Intermediaries

 

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The Handbook includes a chapter on stakeholder analysis: why do it, which are risks and pitfalls. The Handbook suggests how to do stakeholder analysis using a workshop. The guide contains also tools and a matrix that might be used for stakeholder mapping and analysis.

Part of interest: Part 2 on stakeholder analysis.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Higher education institutions, Providers, Innovation business, Payers, Intermediaries

 

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This toolkit contains information on: why and how to carry out stakeholder analysis in small, medium, and big project initiatives. It contains also suggestions on a possible strategy of stakeholders’ involvement, taking into account their capacity of supporting or opposing the project. The toolkit provides examples related to university initiatives.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Higher education institutions, RPOs, Policymakers, CSOs

 

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This short document provides indications on what and what for stakeholder analysis and mapping; who are the stakeholders; the benefits of stakeholder analysis and mapping and how to do it. In particular, it describes the 7 steps for doing stakeholder mapping and analysis.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSOs, Higher education institutions, Innovation business, Providers, Payers, Intermediaries

 

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This is the Stakeholder matrix to be used for the stakeholder analysis for developing a useful engagement plan. The matrix has been drafted and used by the Department of Health and Human Service of Tasmania.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Patients, CSOs, RPOs

 

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The document (Made4You Project, Deliverable D1.1, 2019) shows the stakeholder mapping process that Careables project has undertaken as well as its detailed stakeholder engagement strategies. Two elements are interesting of this resource: the need to identify and describe the community to engage; and the need to distinguish between individual and collective stakeholders. The resource describes different methods of engagement.

Part of interest: In particular Pp. 5-21.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, and CSOs

 

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The article (by Katz, R. et al., 2018) provides an overview of policies triggered by Deliberate Biological Events (DBE) and gives a methodology to map policies (and stakeholders) in response to DBE, that use for visualisation a web-based tool.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: RPOs, Policymakers

 

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This source provides Guidelines on the implementation of the stakeholder participation process, by defining the principles, the reasons and the forms of stakeholder involvement. The Guidelines have been used in MINATURA project aimed at stakeholder involvement in the preservation of mineral resources. The Guidelines describes also the process of stakeholder mapping and identification.

Part of interest: See for stakeholder identification, Pp.22-26.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Innovation business, intermediaries

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This toolkit (created in 2015 in response to a report titled ‘Global Mental Health from a Policy Perspective: A Context Analysis’ made by the Research and Policy in Development (RAPID) team at the Overseas Development Institute ODI) was developed for the Grand Challenges Canada (GCC) ‘community of innovators’. It aims to provide researchers testing innovations in mental health with a set of tools to help them develop their policy influence or engagement strategy towards desired/expected changes. The toolkit is designed to be used by project teams during planning days, team strategy workshops or in day to day planning activities. The Toolkit includes four main tools: 1 − AIIM – Alignment, Interest and Influence Matrix; 2 − Creating a policy influence plan; 3 − Being a knowledge broker; Identifying and accessing ‘champions’. In particular, the tool 3 is useful for knowledge management and communication for a plan.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Innovation business, intermediaries

 

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The LIVERUR project’s short-term objective is to improve knowledge of business models that grow in rural areas, including the understanding of their potential using living labs. LIVERUR created a platform RAIN for improving innovation business model in rural areas. The deliverable (D5.1) titled “Circular rural business hub: database for piloting and stakeholder involvement” contains some useful suggestions on stakeholder mapping. One of the resources of the platform is the LIVERUR toolbox on the use of living labs in rural areas. This toolbox is inspired by the Harmonisation Cube model. One of the faces of the cube is users’ involvement. The toolbox describes the aspects to consider, the task to be accomplished in stakeholder involvement, and provide some specific tools to be used.

Part of interest: Both documents: the annexes of deliverable D5.1 and the part on user involvement, Pp.31-54 of the toolbox.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, CSOs, Innovation business, RPOs, Payers, Intermediaries

 

Section A3

Partnerships and territorial coalitions

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The tool guide has been set up by Wageningen University & Research for promoting and supporting the establishment of Multi-Stakeholders Partnerships (MSP). The tool contains 60 methods for stakeholder partnerships, grouped by six purposes – connection, issue exploration, and shared language, divergence, co-creation, convergence, and commitment. The guide has been written for those directly involved in MSPs – as a stakeholder, leader, action researcher, facilitator, or funder – to provide both the conceptual foundations and practical tools that underpin successful partnerships.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Policymakers, Innovation Business, Professionals, Providers, Patients, CSOs

 

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This article (by Greenhalgh et al., 2017) presents an organisational study on the Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) model of partnerships (using various approaches). BRCs are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. ‘Partnerships for Health, Wealth and Innovation’ has been established with multiple sub-themes (drug development, device development, business support and commercialisation, research methodology and statistics, health economics, bioethics, patient and public involvement and engagement, knowledge translation, and education and training) to support individual BRC research themes and generate cross-theme learning. The ‘Partnerships’ theme will support the BRC’s goals by facilitating six types of partnerships through a range of engagement platforms and activities.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Patients, Providers, Payers, CSOs

 

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The article (by Malva et al., 2018) describes the Ageing@Coimbra community case as a reference site of the European Innovation Partnership on Active Health Ageing based on the involvement of quadruple helix and its impact in Portugal. Ageing@Coimbra partners support a regional network of 70 stakeholders that build a holistic ecosystem in health and social care, taking into consideration the specificities of the territories, living environments, and cultural resources. Good practices in reducing the burden of brain diseases that affect cognition and memory impairment in older people and tackling social isolation in urban and rural areas are among the top priorities of Ageing@Coimbra. Profiting from the collaborative work of academia, business companies, civil society, and authorities, the quadruple helix of Ageing@Coimbra support: early diagnosis of frailty and disease; care and cure; and active, assisted, and independent living. This experience is based on an innovative formula of development of federation of stakeholders and network inspired by the quadruple helix concept.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Policymakers, Innovation Business, Professionals, Providers, Patients, CSOs, Payers

 

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This Report (by Cavallini, Committee of the Regions, 2016) investigates the theory and the operationalisation of the so-called ‘helices models’ were the main protagonists of innovation-generating processes (industry, university, government, and, at a later stage, civil society) interact for accelerating the transfer of research and innovation results to regional growth. The analysis is principally carried out from the perspective of local and regional authorities (LRAs) and in the light of the potential impacts that the operationalisation at the regional level of such models may have on growth, in particular as reference for the development of Research and Innovation Strategies for Smart Specialisation (RIS3). The Report describes the practices and experiences of application.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular the case GP7 case (Pp. 98-100).

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Business Innovation, Patients and CSOs

 

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This paper (by Hasche, Höglund, and Gabriel Linton, 2019) describes and analyses a specific regional smart specialisation initiative taking place in Örebro (Sweden) on robotics that is investigated from a quadruple helix framework (industry, government, academia, and users/civil society). The aim is to understand the relationships and the value created between the different actors. From the results, the authors conclude that the fourth helix should be viewed as a whole – an arena where triple helix actors in different value-adding relationships take on different roles – where they create value to civil society, for example, new jobs or products for improved elderly care. Users in the quadruple helix framework can also be defined in several ways depending on the context of the arena (the fourth helix) and what value-adding activities they bring to civil society. Thus, users can be businesses, organisations, citizens, society, and many more things.

Part of interest: The second part of the article applies the quadruple helix framework to “Robotdalen” case.

Target groups: Policymakers, Payers, RPOs, Innovative Business, Providers, Patients, and CSOs

 

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This is the Progress Report on quadruple helix social labs carried out in the framework of Riconfigure project (Deliverable D6.5, 2020). It presents important questions such as the theory and the practices of quadruple helix collaboration; the integration of quadruple helix and RRI. The Report describes also barriers and obstacles to quadruple helix collaboration, such as s funding, role distribution, incentives, power structures, and path dependency. The general considerations arisen in the report are relevant also for social labs implemented in the healthcare sector.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovation business

 

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The resource (2019) describes the partnership between Karolinska Hospital and Philipps in providing imagining devices and in reorganising the hospital care services. The new organisation for the Hospital of Solna is organized in patient care flows. For example, patients with heart and vascular conditions are treated in an integrated manner, with specialists from functions such as emergency medicine, imaging, and cardiology working together – often in the same building or corridor. In this framework, Karolinska and Philips agreed on a managed equipment services model: Philips coordinated the procurement and commissioning of all required imaging equipments; took on responsibility for the coordination of transport, installation, and commissioning of equipment, and for the training of staff.

Part of interest: The entire document,

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Innovation Business

 

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This document (TeRRItoria Project, Deliverable D3.1, 2019) contains an Inventory of 30 bottom-up governance innovation practices. The Inventory focuses on those governance innovations, promoted by different kinds of coalitions, that activate a process of “re-territorialisation”, i.e., they work for reversing de-territorialisation trends and thus to foster local development and social cohesion. In particular, the Inventory collects the experiences in which research and innovation actors, in different ways, exercise responsibility toward their territory as they play a pivotal role in governance innovation. The territorial coalitions promoted and implemented practices aimed at: re-rooting economic and social activities; recovering and fostering local knowledge; establishing new regulatory frameworks; preventing and managing environmental, social, and economic risks; setting the agenda for defining strategies and actions to solve local problems. The introduction describes the methodology used to set up the Inventory. Some of the practices identified are dealing with healthcare and in particular the practice #11 − Permanent living lab for the governance of city issues including health; #30 − Use of dialogue model for health research agenda-setting process; as well as #31 (but not related to partnership strictu sensu) humanizing healthcare in hospital by art and technology.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular the Inventory, Pp.14-107.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries

 

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Challenge Driven Innovation (CDI) is a research and innovation-funding programme developed by the Vinnova’s Swedish Innovation Agency to fund collaboration in research and innovation that address societal challenges (including future healthcare) addressing Agenda 2030 goals, involving consortia of partners from different parts of society. The program foresees the inclusion of different actors in the project; supports a problem-oriented and demand-driven approach that necessitates anticipation and reflection; encourages learning by doing and responsiveness and capacity of changing and adapting. Gender equality is an important element of CDI. Participation in the CDI program requires the constitution of consortia, involving different kinds of stakeholders during the entire duration of the project, for co-creating and implementing a solution to an identified need/challenge.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Payers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Policymakers

 

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SPARKS is an awareness-raising and engagement project to promote RRI across 29 European countries (EU members plus Switzerland and the UK) and science engagement activities on RRI in health and medicine. This resource is focused on participatory activities for organizing exhibitions and events, and it is articulated in the following parts: rethinking innovation together; innovative participatory activities on RRI (science cafés, pop-up Science Shops, incubation activities and scenario workshops); capturing the scene; guidelines to plan of the work, establishment of local partnerships; different kind of activities, templates for the organizers. The resource contains also experiences and practices. The Handbook provide also advice on how organise and manage a local partnership for the design and the development of an exhibition assigning to the local partners a role as RRI ambassadors.

Part of interest: See the part on the establishment of a local partnership.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Patients and CSOs, Innovation business, Science centres and Museums

 

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The article (by Bainbridge, Potts, O’Higgins, 2011) offers a method for policy network analysis referred to as “Rapid Policy Network Mapping”, which gives insights into relationships and dependencies of policy development in the environmental domain. The resource describes the application of its method to the definition of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the Water Framework Directive in the UK, in which local policymakers and civil society organisations and citizens worked together. This tool should assist civil society in its ability to understand and influence policymaking and implementation. The proposed method facilitates the understanding in a network the relations among policy actors and policy instruments.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs

 

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Ängen is a collaboration with researchers, innovators, caregivers, elderly, and people with disabilities and constitutes a platform where developers and users can meet. Ängen is running several development projects. The purpose is to develop new technical solutions/assistive devices that allow the elderly and disabled to stay longer in the home environment while maintaining independence and integrity. Ängen is a so-called PPP (Private/Public Partnership) and is funded by Örebro University, Örebro municipality, Alfred Nobel Science Park, Länsgården real estates AB and EU.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Innovation business, RPOs

 

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The report describes a collaborative project between Karlskoga Municipality, the healthcare in the western healthcare district of Örebro county, and Möckelnföreningarna, an umbrella organisation for civil society organisations. The project has aimed to find new ways to collaborate and to find new solutions for societal issues through extended cooperation. The project was funded by Vinnova (Sweden’s innovation agency) within the Challenge-Driven Innovation calls: in particular, it received the fund for the Stage 1 initiation and is being funded also for Stage 2.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Innovation business, RPOs

* This resource is available on request, contacting the CHERRIES

Section A4

How to start the process

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The document (Fit4RRI Project, Deliverable D5.1, 2019) contains Guidelines for interpretation, decision, and action aimed at implementing RRI in research organisations, with particular attention to governance settings aspects. It provides recommendations about the triggering factors for institutionalising RRI, enabling factors and obstacles, stakeholders to be involved, etc. The Guidelines contain also links and references to resources to be used for implementing RRI.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs

 

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The document (STARBIOS2 Project, Deliverable D9.1, 2019) contains a model and Guidelines for promoting structural change to attain RRI in bioscience research organisations. The model has been set up on the basis of the implementation of Action Plans for RRI structural change within 9 biosciences organisations in the following countries: Italy, Poland, UK, Slovenia, Germany, Bulgaria, USA, Brazil, and South Africa.

Part of interest: See in particular part 4 “The structural change process in practice”.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institution

 

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The document (by Elster, Barendziak, Birkholz, 2019) provides, on the basis of the implementation of an Action Plan with the University of Bremen carried out in the framework of STARBIOS2 Project, recommendations and suggestions in the RRI field of education. Each recommendation contains links to resources and documents.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPO, Innovation Business

 

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The Map (TeRRItoria Project, Deliverable D3.3, 2019) highlights what are the core issues related to a territorial RRI: the transformations in society; the “de-territorialisation” process; the “territory-making” practices aiming at dealing with de-territorialisation and activating a re-territorialisation (i.e., the development of new meaningful relations among actors and between them and their territory); the territorial dynamics in European landscape; etc. The Map is based on two inventories: on RRI governance innovation practices and on bottom-up governance innovation practices. On the basis of the practices collected, the first list of approaches to Territorial RRI has been set-up. Some practical reference tools (guides, toolkits, regulations, books, articles, etc.) for embedding Territorial RRI are also presented, together with many examples of practices.

Part of interest: See in particular chapters #3, #4, and #5 on Territorial RRI; chapter #6 on tools.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professional, Patients and civil society, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries, Funding organisations, payers

 

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This article (by Fitjar, Benneworth, Asheim, 2019) develops a model for a regional RRI policy, integrating existing European Union policies on RRI in Smart Specialisation Strategy (RIS3). In particular, it contains the inclusion of the geographical element in RRI and a responsible approach of RIS3 based in general on a more inclusive stakeholder engagement and the application of four dimensions of RRI: anticipation, inclusion, reflexiveness, responsiveness. In particular, the approach foresees the inclusion in the RIS3 phases of analysis, governance, vision, prioritisation, policy mix, and monitoring the four dimensions of RRI.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions, CSOs

 

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The NUCLEUS project focuses on identification of key factors for successfully embedding RRI in academic practices. The Implementation Roadmap (Deliverable D3.6, 2017) introduces steps and actions to install 10 embedded Nuclei and 20 mobile Nuclei as innovative and reflective RRI test-beds. It provides also recommendations based on NUCLEUS first phase of activities. This resource might be useful in general for embedding RRI in organisations and contextualisation, but also for building the community/partnership that will be involved.

Part of interest: See, Summary (Pp. 5-6), and Part 1 building the community (Pp. 10-11).

Target groups: Policymakers, Patients and CSO, RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institutions, Intermediaries, Providers

 

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This document (FoTRRIS Project, Deliverable D4.4, 2018) collects all the tools FoTRRIS produced that are necessary to inspire and to guide an interested quadruple helix actor to set up a co-RRI competence cell or to orchestrate a co-RRI transition experiment. In particular, the following tools produced by FoTRRIS are interesting: how to set up a competence cell; how to use the FoTRRIS online platform; Cookbook is included: how to co-create RRI projects.

Part of interest: See in particular “Cookbook: how to co-create RRI projects.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Business, CSOs, Higher Education Institute

 

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This document (drafted in the framework of FoTRRIS project Deliverable D4.3, 2018) contains, in the first part, a definition of co-RRI (co-created Responsible Research and Innovation) and, in the second part, recommendations for implementing Co-RRI at the level of the country system. The co-RRI is an adaptation of RRI at the territorial and glocal challenges.

Part of interest: See the first part devoted to the presentation of co-RRI.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, intermediaries, Higher education institutions

 

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This is the Executive Brief of Responsible Industry project (by Porcari et al., 2015). Responsible Industry aims to integrate principles and methodologies of RRI into the research and innovation processes developed by industries active in the domain of ICT for an ageing society. The resource contains a Framework for the Implementation of RRI providing strategic options and recommendations for industrial actors engaged in R&I to enable them to pursue responsible practices and behaviours in developing devices, products, and services.

Part of interest: See in particular Part 2 on the RRI framework to be implemented in R&I industry.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, CSOs, Providers

 

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This kit set up in the framework of COMPASS project (Deliverable D2.5) is for the use of Business Support Organisations or others keen to support companies in designing Roadmaps towards Responsible Innovation (RI) in the areas of nanotechnology and/or healthcare innovation. The toolkit presents in a clear and easily readable form how to set up phone calls which last about 20 minutes with company leaders and how to introduce them to RI and how to get them involved and how to use findings from these interviews to build custom web forums and webinars. The methods presented are tailored towards SMEs, for example by emphasizing the benefit of the inclusion of RI principles into daily SME practices. SMEs are taught foresight techniques and are aided in constructing a road map.

Part of interest: In particular, from Pg. 6 to Pg. 43.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Start-ups

 

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This document (2019) provides guidelines to develop long-term strategies (roadmaps) to innovate responsibly, integrating technical, ethical, social, environmental, and economic issues into research and innovation practices, by improving the ethical and social impacts of their outcomes. The focus is on transformative and enabling technologies. The road mapping includes 6 steps: commitment and leadership; context analysis; materiality, experiment, and engagement; validation; road map design. The road map uses the 4 dimensions of RRI; the key elements are: product research and innovation; vision of RRI in implementing the product; time scale; drivers, challenges and barriers; actions to be pursued, resources, and process needed.

Part of interest: See in particular Section 6.6. “Validation”.

Target groups: Innovation business

 

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The document was drafted in the context of the ACT for gender equality project Community of practices (CoP). The toolkit describes 20 different participatory methods, online methods, and visual methods. It shows how and which tools and methods the CoPs might operate, develop, implement gender equality plans (GEP), gender equality (GE) measures and activities, and facilitate institutional change concerning GE in HE and R&I. Such methods might be useful in implementing the 6 steps for the process of setting up, implementing, monitoring and evaluating GEPs. It contains also information about success factors, life cycle, and activities of a COPs that requiring the participation and involvement of different actors.

Part of interest: The entire document, and in particular chapters #7, #8, and #9.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institutions, CSOs, Payers, Innovation Business

 

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GRACE’s mission is to develop a set of specific Grounding Actions in six performing and funding organisations (Implementing Organisations). These actions are the basis for the development of a tailored 8-year RRI Roadmap within these organisations to ensure its sustainability and full implementation over the long-term. On its page “Resources” there are resources developed by GRACE and other initiatives related to implementing Grounding RRI Actions to Achieve Institutional Changes. Among others, it presents six guidance on the six keys of RRI, a state of the art review of documented experiences as a basic scheme for self-assessment, a questionnaire about the use of the guidance, and a reflection tool for starting RRI initiative.

Part of interest: The six guidance and the reflection tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institutes, Innovation Business, Payers

 

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The document (PRAGES Project, 2009) contains the outcome of the project, whose main objective has been to take stock of programmes and initiatives found in specific institutional settings (such as universities, institutes, faculties, and departments, but also networks, associations, and S&T-related enterprises) aimed at promoting gender equality in S&T. The Guidelines are composed by 5 parts: part A Women and science: problems at issues at stake; part B Strategy one: a friendly environment; part C Strategy two: gender-aware science; part D, Strategy three – women’s leadership of science in a changing society; part E Programmes that work.

Part of interest: See in particular, the summary charts, Part E “Programmes that work”.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institute

 

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The document (Stages Project, Deliverable D8.3, 2015) contains a description of action plans for promoting institutional change towards equal opportunity in science and provide useful recommendations for implementing structural change action plans.

Part of interest: The entire document. In particular recommendations I “Collecting data and monitoring gender equality” and II “Engaging leadership”.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institution

 

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The Guidelines (Trigger Project, Deliverable D7.5, 2017) provides orientations and analyses to manage what may happen when, in a given research organisation, a gender action plan is launched (be it promoted by a specific project team, the HR Department, the Rector, the Head of a department or other internal stakeholders). The Guidelines take into account also a wider debate on institutional change towards gender equality involving representatives of other 8 EC-funded structural change projects.

Part of interest: The entire document. In particular part 1 “Transformational agent”.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institute

 

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The Guidelines (SET-DEV Project, 2011) are the result of dialogue and cooperation between representatives of three major scientific cultures of Europe, India, and Africa. The Guidelines are a practical contribution about how can be promoted effective collective responsibility in science and technology and how scientific and technological research can better integrate into society and be more relevant to society’s needs. In particular, the document is centred on the concept of socialisation of scientific and technological research and its areas (scientific practice; scientific mediation, scientific communication; evaluation; innovation; governance; gender; substantive approaches). For each of these areas, several frames of responsibility are outlined which act as reference points for identifying problems and finding solutions concerning the relationship between science technology, and society.

Part of interest: In particular, see the general summary with the list of frames of each area, at Pp.21-35.

Target groups: Policy Makers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

 

Section B

Making the process of need identification in health more open, inclusive and responsive to territorial/societal challenges

Section B1

Demand-driven and user-led/people-centric/open innovation approaches in healthcare

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This webinar is part of the first series of episodes promoted by CHERRIES, aimed at exploring relevant aspects for the approach of the project and of the territorial RRI experiments in order to shape more open, inclusive, and sustainable regional healthcare ecosystems. In this webinar, the focus was put on the demand-driven and the role of patient/led user innovation in health. A focus was posed on the role of user/patient and need-based innovation in healthcare, user-producer interactions, regulation, and knowledge production in emerging technology fields. Several questions, and answers, were revolving around the need identification between actors with different perspectives and the implementation of innovation cultures in and between organisations.

Part of interest: The entire webinar.

Target groups: Policymakers (local authorities), Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries

 

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In this article (by Pikkarainen, Hyrkäs, Martin, 2020) are presented the results of a longitudinal study on the success factors of the experience of demand-driven open innovation in health experimented within the framework of the InDemand Project. The focus of the paper is to explore a digital health open innovation ecosystem over the years. The results show that the created demand-driven open innovation model can be used to strengthen the governance of digital health and to improve communication density and knowledge transfer between the ecosystem actors. The findings help policy-makers to use open innovation as a policy instrument supporting hospital and company managers to increase understanding of the opportunities of demand-driven open innovation.

Part of interest: The entire paper.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Policymakers, Patients, Providers, Professionals

 

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The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), is a Public-Private Partnership initiative (PPP) between the European Union (represented by European Commission) and the European pharmaceutical industry (represented by EFPIA) aimed at improving health by speeding up the development of, and patient access to, innovative medicines, particularly in areas where there is an unmet medical or social needs and by facilitating collaboration between the key players involved in health research. By bringing these diverse groups together around one table, the IMI projects can accelerate the development of innovative solutions to the most pressing medical burdens of our time, including antimicrobial resistance, dementia, diabetes, and cancer. The IMI calls for proposals require the participation of citizen and patient organisations that are invited to become a partner in a project by proposing ideas and suggestions.

Part of interest: See the section “The IMI call process” and its annexes.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Policymakers, CSOs, Patients, Payers, Providers, Professionals, Intermediaries

 

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The Project “PARADIGM” (Patients Active in Research and Dialogues for an Improved Generation of Medicines), a public-private partnership co-led by the European Patients’ Forum and EFPIA, aimed at providing a unique framework that enables structured, effective, meaningful, ethical, innovative, and sustainable patient engagement (PE) along the lifecycle of medicines and demonstrates the ‘return on the engagement’ for all players. In the project framework, the PARADIGM Toolbox was developed. It is a comprehensive set of tools and practices to support the integration of the patient perspectives into medicine development beyond the focal areas of the project. In the Toolbox are included the PARADIGM co-created recommendations, tools, and relevant background information to make patient engagement in medicines development easier for all.

Part of Interest: See in particular, sections on “Planning patient engagement” and on “Conducting patient engagement”.

Target: Patients and relevant stakeholders in Healthcare

 

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PREFER Project is aimed at strengthening patient-decision making throughout the life cycle of medicinal treatments by developing expert and evidence-based recommendations on how patient preferences should be assessed and inform decision making. In this PREFER’s article (Whichello et al., 2020) a roadmap for including patient preference in the life cycle of medical treatment is proposed. Recommendations to support the development of guidelines for industry, Regulatory Authorities, and HTA bodies, based on a patient-centric approach are included.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Patients, Professionals, Providers

 

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NESTORE is an innovative personalised ICT coaching system to support healthy ageing, based on co-design principles. The NESTORE system aims at putting the user at the core of the design process in order to address one of the biggest challenges of our century: “how to develop technologies that are useful and usable for the target users?”. The need collection of users, made by involving 80 older people communities in the UK, is described in the deliverable D7.1. “Needs, values, and suggestions to Co-design”; the further co-design for improving the prototype is described in deliverable D7.3 “Report on end-user improvement for prototypes”, related to the validation initiatives with stakeholders carried out in 3 EU countries.

Part of interest: See Deliverables D7.1 and D7.3.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, RPOs, Business Innovation, High Education Institutions

 

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This is a practice promoted by Örebro University. Social Impact Lab (SoIL) is an innovation environment and a programme that focuses on innovations for social sustainability. The programme provides support and expertise for innovative idea development over twelve months, with regular meetings one day a week, involving citizens and stakeholders. At SoIL, researchers and teaching staff from Örebro University participate, as well as staff from other organisations, in creating the right conditions for collaboration and innovation.

Part of interest: The website page.

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs, Innovation business, Policymakers, Payers

 

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This is a Joint thematic policy transfer report made in the framework of Interreg project HOCARE. It is focused on how to boost innovation in-home care by generating new solutions addressing unmet needs identified by formal and informal healthcare providers. It contains a summary of common problems and challenges in generating innovations in-home care based on addressing the unmet needs of healthcare providers and on the identification and analysis of selected good practices in this field. It provides also a transferability matrix and analysis of the identified best practices.

Part of interest: See in particular from Pg. 5 to 9 and from Pg. 27 to 42.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, professionals, Innovation Business, Patients

 

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This document (GET Project “Delivering Growth to Health Business” − 2015) aims to support entrepreneurs and Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) to identify unmet needs in eHealth following a demand-driven approach, through the provision of methods for implementing in concrete this new perspective.

Part of interest: The whole document.

Target groups: Entrepreneurs and SMEs in e-health

 

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The Innovating care for people with multiple chronic conditions in Europe (ICARE4EU) project was focused on improving care for people with multiple chronic conditions (multimorbidity) in European countries. An estimated 50 million people in Europe live with multimorbidity. The complex health problems of these people and their needs for continuous and multidisciplinary care pose a great challenge to health systems and social services. This Policy brief #22 of Icare4Eu project provides insight into how patient-centred care is currently incorporated in innovative care programmes in Europe for people with multimorbidity. It is aimed at facilitating policy-makers in the development of policies directed at patient-centred care for people with multimorbidity.

Part of interest: The whole document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, Innovation Business, RPOs, Patients, CSOs

 

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This article (by de Jong, Wynia, Geluk-Bleumink, 2018) presents an interesting example of the “Care for Elderly Program” in which a patient-centric approach is adopted. The Dutch National Care for the Elderly Programme was an initiative organized by the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) between 2008 and 2016. The programme aimed to collect knowledge about frail elderly, to assess their needs, and to provide person-centred and integrated care better suited to their needs. Putting the needs of elderly people at the heart of the programme and ensuring their active participation was a key to the programme’s success.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs, Higher Education Institutions, Providers

 

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This document (TeRRItoria project, Deliverable D3.1 − 2019) contains an Inventory of 30 bottom-up governance innovation practices. This Inventory is part of a broader work aiming at identifying useful examples, in terms of approaches, policies, and tools, for the development of the 5 “Transformative Experiments” of territorial RRI the project is going to implement. The Inventory focuses on those governance innovations, promoted by different kind of coalitions, that activate a process of “re-territorialisation”, i.e., they work for reversing de-territorialisation trends and thus to foster local development and social cohesion. In particular, the Inventory collects the experiences in which research and innovation actors, in different ways, exercise responsibility toward their territory as they play a pivotal role in governance innovation. In particular, three of the practices of the inventory are focused on health, and it has been set up on the basis of citizen and people needs (including health) and active involvement. These practices are: #11 Living Lab to facilitate learning and collaboration; #22 Cooperation among public services around a local library; and #30 Application of the Dialogue Model for health research agenda-setting process.

Part of interest: The entire document. See in particular: Practice #11; Practice #22; Practice #30.

Target groups: Policymakers (local authorities), Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries

 

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The article (by De Freitas, Dos Reis, Silva, Videira, Morava, Jaeken, 2017) describes an experience of need identification of people with Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG) to elicit social innovations and to promote people-centred care and research. The needs were collected by the implementation of focus groups involving patients, parents and providers, and professionals. The article contains tables summarizing the needs identified during the experience.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Patients, CSOs, Professionals, Providers

 

Section B2

Participatory approaches and methods for patients and multi-stakeholder stakeholders engagement for research agenda setting in health

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In this article (by Teunissen, Visse, Laan, 2013) are provided the results of 7 years of longitudinal analysis of the experience of patient involvement implemented by the Lung Foundation Netherland. NLF can be considered an inspiring practice of RRI institutional change in health for the adoption of a paradigm shift in the research process through patient involvement. NLF holds an extensive network including researchers, health professionals, and patients that are included in the agenda-setting activities. It developed various forms of patient involvement for promoting needs-oriented research: changing its guidelines for proposal writing, communication with patients; participation in projects.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Patients, CSOs, Payers

 

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This inspiration guide sets out different methods that can contribute towards the success of a multi-stakeholder dialogue for participatory priority setting in health research. A process of participatory and deliberated research priority setting involving all stakeholders can assist researchers and policymakers in effectively targeting research that has the greatest potential benefit to patients, the public, and society. The guide is based on a workshop organized by the King Baudouin Foundation with researchers, patients, patient organisations, care providers, pharmaceutical companies, and research funding bodies. In the document are illustrated the five steps of the Dialogue Model (exploration; consultation; prioritisation; integration; programming; implementation).

Part of interest: The whole document. See in particular the 3 examples of implementation; a reflection on the benefit for such participatory priority setting; the basic elements of this kind of activity

Target groups: Patients, CSOs, Policy Makers, Providers, Professionals, Innovation business, Payers

 

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In this article (by Abma, Broerse, 2010) is presented a study aimed at developing a methodology for health research agenda-setting processes grounded in the notion of participation as dialogue. Seven cases were studied to develop and validate a Dialogue Model for patient participation in health research agenda-setting.

Part of interest: The whole article.

Target groups: Patients, CSOs, Policy Makers, Providers, Professionals, Innovation business

 

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This catalogue, set up in the framework of Cimulact Project, contains a description of methods for involving different groups of stakeholders and citizens in participatory research agenda-setting, that can be applied in various fields including health. Among these methods, can be mentioned: citizens’ vision workshop; vision clustering workshop; research agenda camp (co-creation workshop); who, what & why method; consensus workshop; enrich by co-design; prototyping research programme scenarios; the caravan; group interview with a co-design session; etc. The catalogue contains also a glossary, a table on the usefulness of citizen/stakeholder participation, and guidelines on recruitment. The resources of the catalogue can be usefully implemented also in healthcare.

Part of interest: See in particular Citizen’s vision workshop and Vision clustering workshop.

Target groups: CSOs, Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Payers, Providers

 

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The “James Lind Alliance (JLA) Guidebook” provides guidance about how to apply the JLA patient-involvement methodology for setting research priorities in health named “Priority Setting Partnership” (PSP). This JLA Guidebook contains methods, principles, and steps on how to establish a priority setting partnership and also useful examples of application. JLA has been working to identify research priorities in more than 40 areas including emergency medicine, palliative and end of life care, kidney transplantation, and autism. The JLA approach involves a combination of surveys and workshop interactions between patients, carers, and health care professionals to identify and agree on a “Top 10” list of research questions, aimed to highlight important areas for research.

Part of interest: The entire Guidebook.

Target groups: RPOs, Policymakers, Innovation Business, Professionals, Providers, Patients, CSOs

 

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This resource describes an innovative practice of patient engagement in health research on dementia promoted by the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre (UK). The Centre set up an innovative solution for engaging people with MCI (Mild Cognitive Impairment) diagnosis in research, by organising the “Abingdon Afternoon Tea Club (AATC)”, to connect people with MCI with the information they seek and to set up an informal network of people with experience of the condition.

Part of interest: the entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Providers, Patients, CSOs, Professionals

 

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The Living Lab for Health at IrsiCaixa (Barcellona) aims to transform the Research and Innovation (R&I) system to make it more open, inclusive, and transdisciplinary inspired with methodologies that follow RRI and Open Science & Open Innovation criteria. This Lab promotes multi-stakeholder engagement interfaces where different actors are invited to participate in the R&I process at different phases of the value chain (priority setting, project design & execution, implementation, evaluation, dissemination).

Part of interest: The website of the Living Lab and in particular the participatory programs for promoting “Health with and for society”.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs, Higher Education Institutions, Providers

 

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Within the CitieS Health Project, citizens participate in defining research questions, designing and implementing studies, and analysing, interpreting, and communicating results. This document (Deliverable D5.2, 2019), describes the “CitieS-Health Toolkit”, aimed to enable an interactive experience in designing a new brand collaborative bottom-up intervention or as an aid to existing participatory study, or for developing citizen science projects in urban environment and health. It provides a customised and interactive collection of adaptable instruments to empower researchers, individuals, and citizen groups that want to leverage the power of communities to solve common concerns and deploy actions for making the “world a better place to live in”.

Part of interest: See in particular the part of the Toolkit, devoted to the Identification Phase of the Citizen Science project in this field.

Target groups: Scientists, Citizens, Policymakers, Business innovation, concerned with Health and environmental societal challenges

 

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PREFER is aiming at providing recommendations to support the development of guidelines for industry, Regulatory Authorities, and HTA bodies on how and when to include patient perspectives on the benefits and risks of medicinal products. Patient preferences can give information that is critical for developing medical treatments. PREFER is running patient preference studies in both academic and industry settings. This experience will provide a better understanding of what will be a recommended best-practice approach to patient-preference studies. But they can also tell us how much risk patients think is acceptable for a given benefit. The methods to find out, or ‘elicit’ patient preferences are there, but decision-makers are not sure how to assess and use them. The PREFER Project is running three large clinical patient preference studies (including specific focus groups) in three disease areas: lung cancer, neuromuscular disorders, and rheumatoid arthritis. The resource contains the catalogue of the clinical patient preference studies implemented, made by adding to the PREFER portfolio, other clinical studies that cover different disease areas, methods, and research questions. Based on the case studies, PREFER is providing recommendations and guidelines.

Part of interest: The entire resource.

Target groups: RPOs, Professionals, Patients, CSOs, Providers, Innovation Business

 

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This report is an outcome of the EU project Fostering a Transition Toward Responsible Research and Innovation System (FoTRRIS Project, Deliverable D3.1, 2018). It was selected for the CHERRIES Toolbox as a useful example of co-design of project based on co-RRI concept, and in particular as example of co-definition of needs in different areas. The document describes the activities carried out in 5 Co-RRI transition experiments in different European countries, by the implementation of workshops for system mapping; visioning; project concept design; status quo. One of the experiments concerned women with disabilities in Spain, and in particular about co-definition of needs (including health).

Part of interest: See in particular experiment 7 in Spain, from Pg. 136 to 147.

Target groups: Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business

 

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This Social Lab was established within the framework of the NewHoRRIZON. Its focus was on Responsibility in healthcare Research and Innovation. The Lab promoted the implementation of three real-life experiments from which gain insights into how a transformation towards an R&I system in health that is well-aligned with societal needs can be achieved. These pilots concerned: Enriching funding mechanisms (Pilot Action 1). Patient involvement in clinical service design (Pilot Action 2). Good practices of co-creation (Pilot Action 3). Within this last pilot action, characteristics of successful initiatives and instruments for engaging patients and citizens in agenda setting, research, and innovation were identified.

Part of interest: All the presentation of the Social Lab 7-health.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs, Payers, Funding organisations, RPOs

 

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The SISCODE Toolbox (2019) aims to facilitate the design and implementation of co-creation journeys for the integration of RRI principles within 10 SISCODE laboratories, focussing on better understanding and prioritisation of the particularities of each context. One of the laboratories is dealing also with health issues. The toolbox contains a selection of existing tools for the development of the design-based co-creation process from the context analysis, to reframe the problem, to envision and ideation of a solution, the development of a prototype and its experimentation in a real-world context. Among the co-creation experiences, see that of the Thess-Ahall Living Lab focused on the Challenge to fight loneliness in the ageing population using ambient assisted living solutions.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular the part on “Reframe the problem”, (Pp. 23-31), within which you can find the tool “Problem definition canvas” (Pp. 24-25).

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs, Innovation Business, Policymakers

 

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This resource is a WHO’s Toolkit aimed at help researchers (in low and middle-income countries), to adopt an inclusive approach in research in health, providing guidelines and tools for incorporating gender and intersectionality analysis into research on infectious diseases of poverty. This Toolkit is articulated in 9 Modules. Module 1 provides an overview of the role and importance of gender and intersectionality for research on infectious diseases of poverty. Module 2 gives an overview of different approaches to incorporating an intersectional gender lens. Modules 3 and 4 describe intersectional gender analysis activities at the research design and development phase. Modules 5 to 9 describe various ways to use the intersectional lens in different kinds of research.

Part of interest: The entire document: in particular modules 3 and 4.

Target groups: RPOs, Business Innovation, Higher education institutions

 

Section B3

Call for needs, Call for challenges, Open Innovation Calls in health

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The preparation and launch of a regional Call for Needs is the first step of the CHERRIES territorial pilots. The broadening of the process of need identification to make the process more inclusive and responsive to unmet needs and societal challenges in health at the territorial level is an important aspect of the CHERRIES approach. The set-up of a good need inventory is a necessary precondition for the definition of relevant needs and the design of the following process of co-creation for the innovative solution in each region. The open and bottom-up approach of the CHERRIES Calls for needs provided the opportunity to actively contribute, both to individuals and organisations, to key healthcare stakeholders of the R&I system and to individual citizens. On the website as examples are presented the three Call for needs prepared in CHERRIES context.

Part of interest: All the three “Call for needs”.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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The experience of the InDemand Project is an important reference for the development of the CHERRIES Call for needs. This document is an example of the Call for needs or Call for challenges published within that project. InDemand set up and tested a new co-creation model where healthcare organisations (Challengers) and companies (Solvers) co-develop digital health solutions, with the economic support of public regional funds managed by Regional funding organisations (Funders). The first phase of the model is focused on the identification by the challenger of unmet needs (challenges) identified with the involvement of healthcare professionals.

Part of interest: See the challenges related to health and disabilities and those related to aging.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business

* This resource is available on request, contacting the CHERRIES.

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Socialchallenges.eu is an open Platform on social Innovation, funded by EU H2020, which adopted a challenge-based innovation approach to solve societal and environmental local problems. Among the Platform objectives can be cited: supporting European stakeholders (public, private, non-profit) in defining and prioritizing social and societal challenges; encouraging a broad participation of social innovators, social entrepreneurs, start-ups, and SMEs to identify, co-develop and test concrete solution to these needs. The Platform was aimed at creating a social innovation marketplace, where Public Authorities, Private Companies, or Third Sector Organisations were able to post and give visibility to social and environmental challenges they wanted to solve. Different “Challenger owners” (public, private, NGOs, etc.) uploaded their social challenges and were supported by the project to find innovative solutions.

Part of interest: See, in particular, the challenges related to health and disabilities and those related to aging.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPIE) Programme, by Ludwig Boltzmann Gesellschaft (LBG), carries out research “with” or “by” patients and members of the public rather than “to”, ”about” or “for” them). PPIE aims to empower the public and people with lived experiences by involving them in research. Projects address patients’ and the public’s needs and embrace their knowledge from personal experience or practice during the different phases of the research cycle (from setting the agenda to interpreting data) and research governance. Based on this approach, LBG launch specific Calls for Public and patient involvement and engagement in Research.

Part of interest: See Section “Fund”.

Target groups: RPOs, Providers, Patients, Innovation Business, CSOs, Professionals

 

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The ANCES Open Innovation is an Initiative promoted by ANCES, Asociación Nacional de CEEI Españoles, focused on the identification of industrial needs and on the set up of call for solution to SMEs and innovation business able to address such challenges. On the website of the Initiative, there is a general presentation of the procedure and examples of the last 2020 Ances Call and the identification of technologic needs expressed by several enterprises, among which, for instance, that one published by Abbot Nutrición (Ances Open Innovation | ABBOTT).

Part of interest: The website of the Initiative and in particular the page concerning the Needs published in the ANCES Open Call 2020.

Target groups: Intermediary innovation organisations, Funding organisations, Innovation business, Start-ups, SMEs

 

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The “Gendered Innovations in Science, Health&Medicine, Engineering and Environment” is a project initiated by Stanford University in 2009. The goal of the project is to provide scientists and engineers with practical methods for sex and gender analysis. To match the global reach of science and technology, methods of sex and gender analysis were developed through international collaborations. The website contains several theoretical and practical resources concerning: methods of sex and gender analysis and checklist; case studies coming from different disciplines; intersectional design; policy recommendations and videos. A specific section of the website is devoted, among others, to the presentation of case studies that provides practical examples of how sex and gender analysis lead to gendered innovations in medicine. It is important to take into account and to integrate gender issues in innovation also in applying demand-driven and user-led/people-centric/open innovation process in healthcare.

Part of interest: The entire website. In particular, see the sex and gender analysis section and the section on case studies in health and medicine.

Target groups: Providers, RPOs, Innovation business, Higher education institutions

 

Section C

Co-creation for the inclusion of social value in design, development and test of responsible Innovation solutions in health

Section C1

Call for solution for addressing needs and challenges

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At the beginning of January 2021, the CHERRIES Project is launching in the three territories of Örebro (Sweden), Murcia (Spain), and Cyprus the Call for solutions, mainly addressed to SMEs, Start-ups, and innovators able to co-create in a participative way a solution to the needs identified in the previous step. The text of the Call contains the selection criteria of the proposal, the template to be filled by the participants, and information on the way to participate and timing. The launch of the Call is being accompanied by a communication campaign and the organisation of meetings in the three territories.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Providers, Start-ups

 

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Socialchallenges.eu is a Platform aiming at creating a marketplace where actual social challenges can meet powerful and innovative solutions, where Public, Private and Third Sector Stakeholders can upload social and environmental challenges to receive innovative solutions from European innovators, start-ups, and SMEs.

Part of interest: See in particular the challenges related to health and disabilities, and those related to aging.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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This is the text of the open Call for solutions Platform including eligibility criteria, calls details, and evaluation criteria set up the Social Challenges Innovation Platform.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, Patients and CSO, Payer, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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This is the template for the submission of solutions defined and used in the Social Challenges Innovation Platform.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs

 

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The document contains the instructions to apply for solutions and describes the functioning of the platform used by the Social Challenge Innovation Platform project in the 2nd cut-off date, in 2018. Social Challenges Innovation Platform has foreseen two elements in the call for solution: Value proposition for Challenge Owners and Solution providers.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Providers, Professionals

 

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The resource is the Matrix set up and used by the Social Challenges Innovation Platform Project (Deliverable D2.3) to assess proposed solutions to a specific challenge.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, RPOs, Innovation business

 

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This document is an example of an Open Call for companies for co-creation of digital health solutions to challenges identified by health professionals, published within the framework of the InDemand Project which is a reference experience of demand-driven innovation for CHERRIES too. InDemand set up and tested a new co-creation model where healthcare organisations (Challengers) and companies (Solvers) co-develop digital health solutions. The first phase of the Model is focused on the need identification by the Challenger (Healthcare organisation) by the launches of a “Call for challenges” in several European regions. The second phase of the Model is the launch of the Call for solution, which is referred to the link, regarding the call launched in Murcia in 2019, containing the description of the 4 challenges selected among the around 60 challenges identified by health professionals within the SMS-Servicio Murciano de Salud (Spain).

Part of interest: The entire resource.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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These are the materials defined and used by InDemand Project in 2018 in Open the Call for companies for solution in Murcia to solve health issues and challenges identified by healthcare professionals (text of the open Call and the related document as application forms, guide for applicants, administrative documents, etc.).

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Providers, Professionals, Start-ups

 

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The resource includes the Guide for applicants of the InDemand project set up and used in the 6th Open Call Paris 2nd for solutions and the other documents related to the call (template to be used, declarations to be signed, etc.). In particular, the Guide describes the challenges to consider, the criteria for applying, the evaluation criteria, the process of selection, the co-creation activities.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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It is an initiative ANCES Open Innovation focused on the identification of need/challenge and a call for solution to SMEs and innovation businesses able to address such need/challenge. The website presents also the form to be filled for participating in the initiative ANCES Open Innovation. The tool is in Spanish.

Part of interest: The entire website and in particular Section “Participar”.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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The present resource (Deliverable D4.1. “Open Call results”, 2019) illustrates the aim and the procedure implemented for the launch of an Open Call, addressed to Science Shop entities, within the framework of the InSPIRES project. This Call was aimed at providing financial support for the implementation of participatory research projects focused on RRI in health and environmental issues. InSPIRES brings together practitioners and experts to co-design, jointly pilot, implement, and roll-out innovative models of participatory research projects for the Science Shops target. The InSPIRES models integrate RRI, Open Science, and Impact Evaluation to open the research process up in a more strategic way to civil society and other stakeholders.

Part of interest: See in particular the Annex 1 “Terms and conditions of the Open Call”.

Target groups: Science shops and RPO’s, Policymakers, CSOs, Innovation business, Citizens/Patients

 

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Challenge Driven Innovation (CDI) is a research and innovation-funding programme developed by Vinnova’s Swedish Innovation Agency to fund collaboration in research and innovation that address societal challenges. The program foreseen inclusion of different actors in the project; supports a problem-oriented and demand-driven approach that necessitates anticipation and reflection; encourages learning by doing and responsiveness and capacity of changing and adapting. Gender equality is an important element of CDI.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Payers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Policymakers

 

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This document, produced by the King Baudouin Foundation and the European Foundations Award for RRI (EFARRI), describes the Award for RRI 2016 by a call for projects on RRI in the European Research Area. The EFARRI aims to identify research groups that have successfully incorporated methods to align research with the needs of society and contributed towards the development of a smart, inclusive, and sustainable society. The document describes 8 steps of the Award, the content of the call for project, the selection procedure, the composition and work of the Jury, the Award Ceremony, and dissemination activities. The Award incorporates RRI dimensions among the criteria for selecting the projects.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular Pp. 6-14 for the methodology of the Award. The document presents also the 15 RRI finalist practices.

Target groups: Payers, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs, Higher Education Institutions, Policymakers

 

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The NWO − Dutch Council Research in the framework of its RRI program, is carrying out from 2018 a series of initiatives using RRI dimension as criteria for a call for proposals aimed at promoting interdisciplinary collaboration between researchers from the humanities, natural sciences, engineering, and social sciences. One of these initiatives is IMDI Innovative Medical Devices Initiative. IMDI is a strategic public-private partnership that was established in 2010. It specifically focuses on the development and application of medical technology that tackles the increasing shortage of healthcare personnel and safeguards accessibility to healthcare. NWO Responsible Innovation Programme is an important component in various IMDI calls paying special attention to social and ethical issues.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Payers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Policymakers

 

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CREW, Codesign for REhabilitation and Wellbeing, is a research project developed by Fondazione Cariplo with the scope to create innovative technological solutions in the motor and cognitive rehabilitation field and aimed to the facilitation of the social inclusion of people with permanent, temporary, or age-related disabilities. CREW was shaped on the European model of RRI, using co-design as a methodology to express and identify the needs and find the related solutions. This was carried out by five project laboratories dedicated to: sport and disability, school integration and autism, neuro-motor paediatric disabilities, ambient living to maintain life autonomy, and for a new life autonomy. The resource is in Italian.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Patients, CSOs, Providers, Professionals

 

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This resource, set in the framework of CAREABLE project (Deliverable D2.1), presents a selection of 45 best practices in 9 fields of application in Open Healthcare, sourced from online repositories. The Open Healthcare map shows various existing platforms where makers share open-source solutions. It shows a variety of complexity and relevance of repositories online.

Part of interest: See the entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs

 

Section C2

The engagement of patients, citizens and public in innovation and research

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This is the interactive tool to assess the institution’s support for public engagement, provided by the National Co-ordination Centre for Public Engagement. Besides the tool, the website contains also resources on public engagement.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, RPOs, Business Innovation, High Education Institution

 

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The aim of the toolkit, set up in the framework of the EU project PE2020, is to provide easy, rapid and guided access to practical and theoretical knowledge on strategies and approaches to public engagement with science. The toolbox is composed of four sections: section A strategic framework; section B methods and tools; section C, institutional anchorage; section D, societal anchorage. In particular, part B contains inputs and resources about: types of public engagement and connections with organisational processes; designing PE initiatives; implementing PE initiatives; monitoring and evaluation.

Part of interest: See also PE2020 Catalogue of Public engagement initiative and the Inventory of PE initiatives.

Target groups: Policymakers, Patients and CSOs, Providers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Intermediaries

* This resource is available on request, contacting the CHERRIES.

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This is a practical guide set up by the Project EFFECT for communication and public engagement activities on the future and emerging technologies (2018). It contains the description of 10 methodologies for public participation in science and 4 methodologies for younger involvement and a form on evaluation procedures.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Patients and CSOs, Providers, Payers, Intermediaries, RPOs

 

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The PROSO Project aims at advancing insights into factors that influence the engagement of two types of societal actors, namely third sector organisations (TSOs) and non-organized citizens. This document deals with the engagement of the latter. In particular, it contains a description of how to design a citizen panel. The resource (Deliverable D4.1, 2016) is also useful for those stakeholders engaged in promoting the participation of single citizens.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Providers, Professionals, Patients, Citizens, CSOs, Policy Makers, Higher Education institutions

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The catalogue is an online platform, and it is one of the products of Engage2020 Project. The catalogue gives an overview of 57 methods that can be used for engaging society in research and innovation. It contains detailed factsheets on all the collected methods, providing information such as objectives, background, different levels of research and innovation activity, and examples of use. The catalogue has a search engine. The content of the catalogue has been also published in the Deliverable D3.2. “Public engagement methods and tools”.

Part of interest: Each user might choose the method of interest.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs, Higher Education Institutions, Payers, Providers

 

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Citizen science models of public participation in scientific research represent a growing area of opportunity for health and biomedical research, as well as a new impetus for more collaborative forms of engagement in large-scale research. However, this also surfaces a variety of ethical issues that both fall outside of and build upon the standard human subjects concerns in bioethics. This article (by Wiggins, Wilbanks, 2019) provides background on Citizen science, examples of current projects in the field, and a discussion of established and emerging ethical issues for Citizen science in health and biomedical research.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: RPOs and Scientists, CSO and Citizens, Policymaker, Business innovation

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This article (by Palmer et al., 2017) is focused on the usefulness of Citizen science in health. Traditional surveillance tools are limited by jurisdictional boundaries and cost constraints. The article shows how a scalable Citizen science system can solve this problem by combining citizen scientists’ observations with expert validation and correcting for sampling effort. The system described in this article provides accurate early warning information about the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) invasion in Spain collected using Citizen science, providing data well beyond those available from traditional methods, and vital for public health services.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs

 

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This is the Toolkit drafted by the European Patient Forum. Starting from a definition of patient empowerment and related concepts, the document provides key advocacy tools of patient empowerment.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs

 

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This is a resource made by the PARADIGM Project. The Toolbox contains co-created recommendations, tools, and relevant background information to make patient engagement in medicines development easier for all. In particular, the Toolbox is articulated in three main areas: planning patient engagement; conducting patient engagement; reporting, and evaluation. The Toolbox includes the following resources: evaluation and monitoring framework; code of conduct for patient engagement; guidance on patient dialogue in the early stage of patient engagement; guidance on managing competing and conflicts of interest.

Part of interest: The entire toolbox.

Target groups: RPOs, Business Innovation, Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs

 

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This Matrix (developed by Smits, Klem, and Ketelaar, Centre of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine Utrecht) has been developed to promote collaboration with patients (from the age of 12) in projects and research. The Guide contains info about the ‘what’ (roles, phases, and activities of patient involvement in a project) and the ‘how’ (principles for having dialogues and concrete recommendations for using the Matrix). The Matrix identifies 6 roles: listener; co-thinker; advisor; partner, decision-maker. The Matrix singles out three phases: preparatory phase; execution; implementation.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, RPOs, Patient, Professionals

 

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The aim of PREFER Project (to which this resource is connected) is to strengthen patient-centric decision-making throughout the life cycle of medicinal treatments by developing expert and evidence-based recommendations on how patient preferences should be assessed and inform decision making. The project is identifying 15 critical decision moments in which it is important to include patient preferences in the medical product lifecycle. Patient preference (PP) information is currently not routinely considered one of the requirements for decision-making. The resource (by Whichello et al., 2020) proposes a road map for including patient preferences in the life cycle of medical treatment.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Patients, Professionals, Providers

 

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This is an article (by Jordanou, 2019) on the obstacles met by SMEs in involving the patient in research. This issue is examined on the basis of 18 in-depth interviews with private healthcare industry representatives from across Europe in companies focusing on developing medical device technology. Findings suggest that SMEs are reluctant to undertake research involving patients, especially in the early stages of the research and innovation process. For some SMEs, this is due to concerns about the dangers of raising expectations they cannot meet, while for others the main concerns are increasing costs and producing less competitive products. Recommendations in this respect are also provided.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: CSOs, Innovation business, Patients, RPOs

 

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The Guidelines (set up in the framework of Multiact Project) propose a roadmap to capture the ‘experiential knowledge’ of patients, to better understand how to draw on their experience and use the experience constructively for co-creation purposes. The roadmap consists of four activities: setting up an Engagement Coordination Team with trained figures; selecting the research steps where patient engagement is instrumental to meet the project’s mission/agenda; developing an engagement plan for each research identified steps; selecting the indicators to be used to measure the success and effectiveness of this engagement. 7 steps for patient engagement are foreseen: Translation to community; Setting research priorities; Breaking down boundaries between patients and stakeholders; Research design and plan; Research evaluation; Steering institutions; Research execution.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, Patients, RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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This a Guide drafted by the European Commission on the use of social media on health and vaccination communication, particularly relevant in the context of Covid-19 pandemic. The Toolkit provides suggestions on how to use social media for correct information and communication on vaccination. In particular, it suggests 7 steps for engaging and starting communication activities on health issues. Communication is a basic element of public engagement.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business, Media

 

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IMI is a Public-Private Partnership initiative, aimed at improving health by speeding up the development of, and patient access to innovative medicines, particularly in areas where there is an unmet medical or social need, and by facilitating collaboration between the key players involved in health research. Citizens are invited to participate in the PP IMI by becoming a partner in a project or member of project advisory committees or associate partner or by proposing ideas and suggestions. IMI launches calls for proposals and publishes draft topics texts on future topics. The calls require the participation of citizen and patient organisations.

Part of interest: See the general overview and the call documents.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Policymakers, CSOs, Patients, Payers, Providers, Professionals, Intermediaries

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In the framework of the Project U-BIOPRED has been draft the guidelines on successful involvement of patients in the EU project. U-BIOPRED Project is aimed to speed up the development of better treatments for patients with severe asthma. Patients (including also caregivers and patient organisations) were involved in the consortium and participated with their experiences to the outcomes of the Project. Patient involvement can optimise the ethics, relevance, accountability and transparency, communication, promotion, and implementation of research outcomes. Patient involvement groups might have different forms, all able to bring their own experience to support a project.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Providers, Patients, CSOs

 

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The case study (by Navda, 2018), linked with Orbit project, describes how people with dementia and their carers have been involved in several different and creative ways in the initial development and testing of a working prototype of a computer-based planning tool for people with dementia and their carers. The tool, called My Brain Book, aims to record information about the person with dementia in order to produce a care plan that is created jointly between the person with dementia and their families and shared easily with a range of professionals. Engagement activities included: a parallel priority-setting event, focus groups, involvement in design workshops, and testing of the prototype.

Part of interest: The entire document. It contains also a description of the way by which people with dementia and their family and caregivers have been involved.

Target groups: RPOs, Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs

 

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¡Pasa la voz! is a raising awareness project about Chagas disease to improve access to diagnosis and treatment. It was among the finalists of the EFARRI-European Foundations Award for RRI in 2016. EFARRI aims to identify research groups that have successfully incorporated methods to align research with the needs of society and contributed towards the development of a smart, inclusive, and sustainable society. The project carried out by the ISGlobal team foresees the involvement of the different stakeholders since the beginning of the activities.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs

 

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This case study is focused on telemedical applications in the area of diabetes care through the case of GlucoTel™, a telemonitoring system developed by BodyTel™. It links the company’s activities to aspects of RRI such as addressing societal challenges, stakeholder engagement, legal requirements, and open access. BodyTel™ engages stakeholders such as patients and caregivers during its development processes to improve the treatment of chronic diseases and contribute to a higher quality of life for patients. These were the 5 stakeholder groups considered: patients & family, caregivers & medical advisers, health insurance companies; medical technological & pharmaceutical companies; integrators of sensors and services.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Patients, Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business

Section C3

Engagement and mobilisation of stakeholders in research and innovation activities

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The Guide (drafted in the framework of TeRRIFICA project, Deliverable D4.1., 2019) describes tools, activities, and methodology for stakeholder engagement and co-creation for climate change, on the basis of the pilots carried out by TeRRIFICA. In particular, the focus is on how addressing possible conflicts, challenges on public engagement. The document might be useful for stakeholder mapping and engagement (section A) and for co-creation activities (section C). Each part contains examples based on TeRRIFICA experiences.

Part of interest: See section 2.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSO, RPOs, Innovation business

 

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Repository of toolkits on public engagement and science communication set up by EU projects on public engagement, citizen engagement, and co-creation. The resources of this platform might be useful in all the phases of implementation of CHERRIES approach.

Part of interest: The entire platform.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Higher Education institutions, CSOs, Payers, Providers

 

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The document describes a pool of activities for co-creation labs and Open Days (SISCODE Project, Deliverable D7.3, 2019) that labs can use or take inspiration from to create an interactive and engaging programme for local audiences. The activities selected and described are: 12 ice-breakers, 14 dialogue activities, and 9 engagement activities.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Innovation business, RPOs, CSOs

 

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This is a PROSO Project support tool for promoting engagement of citizens and third sector actors in research and in research and innovation policy. In particular, the document identifies lowering barriers and innovating policies and practices for addressing such barriers, with different options. These are six barriers: lack of relevance; lack of impact; lack of trust and critical views of others; lack of knowledge and skills; lack of time and finances; and lack of legitimacy. Different options are provided for different actors, namely policymakers and governmental agencies, research funding organisations and research councils, public and private research organisations and (other) engagement performing organisations, and third sector actors.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, Patients, RPOs, Innovation Business, Payers

 

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The document was drafted in the context of the ACT for gender equality Project Community of practices (CoP). The toolkit describes 20 different participatory methods, online methods, and visual methods. It shows how and which tools and methods the CoPs might operate, develop, implement gender equality plans (GEP), gender equality (GE) measures and activities, and facilitate institutional change in relation to GE in HE and R&I. Such methods might be useful in implementing the 6 steps for the process of setting up, implementing, monitoring and evaluating GEPs.

Part of interest: The entire document, and in particular chapters #7, #8 and #9.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institutions, CSOs, Payers, Innovation Business

 

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This document shows the detailed stakeholder mapping and the engagement strategies process that Careables project (Deliverable D1.1, 2018) has applied.

Part of interest: See in particular section 5.5.

Target groups: Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs

 

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SPARKS is an awareness-raising and engagement project to promote RRI across 29 European countries (EU members plus Switzerland and the UK). This resource focused on participatory activities, and it is articulated in the following parts: rethinking innovation together; innovative participatory activities; capturing the scene (guidelines to plan of the work, establishment of local partnerships; different kinds of activities, templates for the organizers). The resource contains also experiences and practices.

Part of interest: See the part on Guidelines for implementing innovative participatory activities on RRI (science cafés, pop-up Science Shops, incubation activities, and scenario workshops).

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Patients and CSOs, Innovation business

Section C4

Co-creation of the solution

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This training kit, set up in the framework of Careable project, provides all the practical information for people that need to set up an event series and guide the process by the organisation of a prototyping series. It gives guidelines and tips on: how to find partners to cooperate with, how to gather a diverse group of participants, how to set up the different stages of the prototyping series, how to document the overall process and resulting products on Careables.org. This is a useful tool to create a fruitful environment in which organisations can successfully work together and develop freely and design solutions, based on the needs of individual patients.

Part of interest: See in particular the Appendix #13 “Healthcare co-design toolkit”.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs

 

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The Co-Creating Welfare Training Course aims to enable professional practitioners within the health and social welfare sector to create, implement, and evaluate co-creating processes with the citizens benefitting from the welfare services of their organisation. The Training Course is built around 4 training themes that are: Creating a common understanding of co-creation; Initiating the co-creation process through collaborative problem formulation; Managing the co-creation process; Dissemination and communication of the co-creation process and its results. There is also an online Tool that contains a report with all the material of the training course, videos, the deck of co-creation tool cards. Different tools are proposed that might be used for different a kind of activities: brainstorming; problem identification; design solution, etc.

Part of interest: The entire web tool.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients and CSOs

 

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The first episode of the “CHERRIES webinar series 2020 Exploring responsible healthcare ecosystems in Europe” was devoted to a reflection on “Regional innovation ecosystems for healthcare”, with the contribution of Wouter Boon (University of Utrecht) and Myriam Martin (Ticbiomed; InDemand Project). During the webinar was discussed the role of users in the healthcare innovation process; how demand/need driven innovation approaches can result in improved healthcare ecosystems; and which are the key issues to be considered when launching a co-creation process.

Part of interest: The entire webinar.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

 

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CRISH (Co-CReating Innovative Solutions for Health) main objective is to bring together key stakeholders of the health sectors, including patients, for learning how to co-create innovative processes, products or services for health improvement and jointly anticipating emerging trends on health and ageing. CRISH is a short course providing knowledge, skills, and tools on patient experience methodology (XPA), responsible research and innovation components (RRI), entrepreneurship elements (ENT), and reciprocity and co-design methods (RcD) to a variety of health stakeholders. CRISH trains health professionals, home caregivers & researchers in identifying, with patients, critical points for future research, re-design of clinical services through the patient experience methodology, and identify ideas to pursue the development of innovative solutions.

Part of interest: All the links.

Target groups: Providers, Patients, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation business.

 

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WE Health is an EIT Health Campus programme designed to enhance the participation of women in health innovation and entrepreneurship. WE Health empowers female health innovators by providing training specifically tailored to their needs, offering inspiration and support to help them advance in their professional careers. WE Health also aims to raise awareness of the positive economic and social impact of gender diversity in health innovation, while generating new ideas that promote innovation across the entrepreneur community in a more balanced way.

Part of interest: The entire platform.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Higher Education Institutions, CSOs

 

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This is the Deliverable D5.1 of the InDemand Project describing the co-creation activities and business support in the three regions of Murcia (Spain), Oulu (Finland), and Paris. In particular, the Report describes the third phase of InDemand, in which Challenger and Solver develop together a new healthcare solution. Solver receives business advice from the Supporter. These activities facilitate the co-creation between Challengers and Solvers as well as the delivery of business support. At the end of co-creation, Funder oversees the Evaluation and Payment process. This phase is organised in the following steps: preparation; management of co-creation; management of business support; evaluation and payment; assessment and contribution to the knowledge base.

Part of interest: The whole document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Providers, Professionals, Patients, Payers

 

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The web tool describes the demand-driven co-creation approach used by InDemand Project in the three pilots in Spain (Murcia Region), Finland (Oulu Region), and France (Paris Region) and within InDemand Community, and by which is possible to access various resources. According to this model, healthcare organisations and companies co-create digital health solutions with the economic support of public regional funds. inDemand applies at the same time demand-driven and co-creation approaches.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, RPOs, Innovation business

 

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The Guide (drafted in the framework of TeRRIFICA project, Deliverable D4.1., 2019) describes tools, activities, and methodology for stakeholder engagement and co-creation for climate change, on the basis of pilot projects carried out by TeRRIFICA. In particular, the focus is on how addressing possible conflicts and challenges on public engagement. The document might be useful for stakeholder mapping and engagement (section A) and for co-creation activities (section C). Each part contains examples based on TeRRIFICA experiences.

Part of interest: Pp. 28-35 for co-creation; Pp. 36-50 methods of engagement and co-creation. Challenges to engagement and co-creation Pp. 51-73.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSO, RPOs, Innovation business

 

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This is the Handbook on co-creation and business support services drafted and used during the third phase of the InDemand Project on co-creation and business support management. The Handbook describes the support activities that are being deployed during the co-creation phase by a mentorship and coaching program. It describes also the activities for the development of the solution by a co-creation health lab and a business modelling support (definition of the business model; go-to-market strategy; funding).

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Policymakers, Patients, CSOs, Providers, Professionals

 

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This is a Manifesto (in Italian and English) set up by Open dot in collaboration with TOG Fondazione Together to Go, on co-design on health and care. The Manifesto contains 8 principles to follow in co-design activities to create new solutions by generating innovation. The Manifesto allows to adapt, personalise, and even create more effective solutions from scratch, taking into account the fact that people have not unique tastes and necessities. Citizens have not to be seen just as patients of a certain pathology. The principles are: listen and observe, speak the same language, share the needs, think and design together, prototype, share, and replicate and communicate. The Manifesto is linked with a toolkit.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs, Providers, Patients, Professionals

 

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This is the Deliverable D1.2 of the SISCODE project. The document contains reviews of literature respectively dedicated to: a comparative analysis of co-creation in policy-making at large, and in STI policy making in particular; a comparative analysis of co-creation methodologies and tools that can be applied in RRI practices.

Part of interest: In particular the chapter 4 on design for policymaking, chapter 5 on the co-creation in RRI practices, and annex 1.

Target groups: Policymakers, Payers, RPOs, Innovative Business, Providers, Patients, CSOs

 

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The SISCODE Toolbox (2019) aims to facilitate the design and implementation of co-creation journeys for the SISCODE laboratories, focussing on better understanding and prioritisation of the particularities of each context. The Toolbox contains a selection of existing tools for the development of the design-based co-creation process from the context analysis, to reframe the problem, to envision and ideation of a solution, the development of a prototype and its experimentation in a real-world context.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular the part on Envision and Ideation of the solution.

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs, Innovation Business, Policymakers

 

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This catalogue, set up in the framework of Cimulact Project (available online and in pdf format − 2018), contains a description of methods for involving different groups of stakeholders and citizens in participatory research agenda-setting. Those methods are: citizens’ vision workshop; vision clustering workshop (extract commonalities or underlined needs from visions); research agenda camp (co-creation workshop): from commonalities or needs to research programme scenarios; who, what & why method; consensus workshop; enrich by co-design; prototyping research programme scenarios; the caravan; group interview with a co-design session; facilitated stakeholder working group; word cafe. The catalogue contains also a glossary, a table on the usefulness of citizen/stakeholder participation and guidelines on recruitment, and info on logistics. The catalogue is useful also for co-creation and prototyping activities.

Part of interest: All the resources, and in particular those for co-creation and prototyping.

Target groups: CSOs, Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Payers, Providers

 

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Digital Health Europe will provide comprehensive, integrated, and centralised support to the Digital Health and Care Innovation initiative in the context of the Digital Single Market Strategy. The project’s approach involves a number of actions that will boost innovation and advance the Digital Single Market priorities for the digital transformation of health and care (DTHC). The catalogue contains practices of digital solutions in healthcare, including those related to the management of healthcare for Covid-19 pandemic. This resource might provide useful information about innovation policies and good practices.

Part of interest: The entire catalogue.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries, Payers

 

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This guide of Nesta Foundation (2017) explores the ways that companies, governments and researchers around the world are collaborating to improve the innovation process in health, from the way that problems are identified to how new products and services are created and then adopted by providers of healthcare. The guide describes three steps of innovation: problem identification; invention; adoption and diffusion; cross-cycle initiatives. Aims of this innovation guide are: making health innovation more efficient; informing health innovation with a better understanding of the health system and patient/citizen needs; making health innovation more democratic. In all the innovation phases it is foreseen the involvement of citizens and professionals.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular from Pg. 10 to 65.

Target groups: Policymaker, RPOs, Innovation business, CSOs, Providers, Professionals

 

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The EU-funded GoNano Project enables co-creation between citizens, civil society organisations, industry, researchers, and policymakers across Europe to align future nanotechnologies with societal needs and concerns. GoNano co-creates with different stakeholder novel suggestions for future nanotechnology products. On the portal, there are: a knowledge database, several co-creation tools developed by profit and non-profit organisations, and examples of co-creation initiatives with citizens and stakeholders on nanotechnology in health.

Part of interest: See all the co-creation tools.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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This is a resource tied with the eHealth EU Funded Initiative. In February 2017, Hospital Bernal, a private hospital located in the Region of Murcia (Spain), asked eHealth HUB to help them to identify and evaluate digital solutions to remotely monitor low-complexity chronic patients from their homes. Hospital Bernal was particularly interested in monitoring at least Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), and Diabetes. eHealth HUB’s first Solution Match was launched and a European-wide public call for solutions was opened. This Solution Match report features and compares the solutions of 71 responses to this call. The document accompanies the call for proposals.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Providers, Professionals, Patients, Payers

 

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This is an article (by Chowdhury, 2012) on Hacking Health experience held in Canada in 2012. The hackathon was focused on social innovation (with at least an education aim) more than technical innovation. The approach is aimed to improve healthcare to pair technological innovators with healthcare experts to build realistic, human-centric solutions to front-line healthcare problems. The hackathons may be focused directly on launching apps. From the onset, Hacking Health was designed to catalyse entrepreneurial teams and projects to address issues in healthcare through business models.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Innovative Business, Start-ups, RPOs, Professionals

 

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This is a chapter of Technologies for Development (by Mantzavinou et al., 2018) describing the experiences of MIT Hacking Medicine, a group founded in 2011 at MIT, aims to energize the healthcare community and accelerate medical innovation by carrying out co-creation through health hackathons. These 1- to 3-day events bring together diverse stakeholders to solve pressing healthcare needs. The hackatons aim to generate a network of individuals compelled to make healthcare better by exchanging ideas, knowledge, and skills in the long term. The article describes the activities needed to prepare and implement an hackaton.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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NESTORE is an innovative personalised ICT coaching system to support healthy ageing, based on co-design principles. The NESTORE system aims at putting the user at the core of the design process in order to address one of the biggest challenges of our century: “how to develop technologies that are useful and usable for the target users?”. This system has been defined by a co-design process used for informing technologists on the user’s needs and desires. The need collection of users is described in the deliverable “D7.1. Needs, values and suggestions to Co-design”; the further co-design for improvements the prototype is described in deliverable D7.3 Report on end-user improvement for prototypes, related to the validation initiatives with stakeholders carried out in 3 EU countries. The website contains also use cases and illustrations of the technology.

Part of interest: See Deliverables D7.1 and D7.3.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, RPOs, Business Innovation, High Education Institutions

 

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This is a practical guide on social labs (by Hassan, 2015). The Field Book describes what is a social lab, how to implement it, considering its three characteristics: as a laboratory, a space for multi-disciplinary collaboration and a strategy for addressing a complex challenge. In particular, the Field Book attempts to support practitioners who are interested in building social labs. It provides practical, step-by-step guidance as to how to design spaces, run processes and build the team requires to run labs. The approach suggested is to work consciously on the design of each stack and cultivate each of these stacks over time.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Policymakers, Patients, CSOs, Providers, Professionals, Intermediaries, Higher education institutions

 

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The aim of this resource (set up in the framework of CAREABLE project) is to share knowledge about organising co-creation sessions for making healthcare solutions and enabling others to organise such sessions in which the innovative capacities of different people can lead to meaningful healthcare innovation. This resource should be used as a guidebook. It might be used to decide on a setup for tools, but also for templates for exercises help people in developing the healthcare solution that they feel is needed.

Part of interest: Pp. 2-28.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients, CSOs, Business innovation

 

Section C5

Legal, Ethical and Privacy requirements in co-creation research and innovation

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The PRISMA Project involved social science researchers and technologists from five different research organisations around the EU talking to eight technology projects about Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). The goal was to draw specific lessons about how RRI can be implemented in practice in the industry. The document presents two different approaches in embedding RRI: an approach focused on external support to the industry; and an approach based on the embedding of ethicists in the research team. The document contains in its normative part, some legal and ethical aspects that have to be taken into consideration in the ICT co-creation and innovation activities, such as privacy protection and use of personal data; data ownership; transparency and open access; democratic consent; distribution of risk and harm; and sustainability.

Part of interest: the part on the social and ethical aspects related to innovation (Pp. 9-15).

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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This document, drafted in the framework of CAREABLE Project (Deliverable D6.1.), is focusing on privacy and data protection, intellectual property legal framework, liability, and medical devices, and ethics to be taken into account in the innovation process in health. Careables.org online platform represents a central hub for sharing knowledge for reproduction and self-creation of customised healthcare solutions, where individuals with particular needs, healthcare professionals, makers, designers, donors, and co-founders work collaboratively online in order to create custom-made healthcare solutions. The resource contains an inventory of ethical and legal rules that have to be considered in healthcare innovation and creation.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Patients and CSOs, Policy Makers, Providers, Professionals, Innovation business, Payers, RPO

 

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This is the framework on ethical impact assessment defined by SATORI Project and approved by the European Committee for Standardisation by a CEN Workshop agreement CWA17145-2. The framework is focused on innovation and it has been developed on the basis of an analysis of existing research practices and their results. It consists of two parts. Part 1 makes recommendations for the composition, role, functioning, and procedures of ethics committees. Part 2 provides researchers and organisations with guidance on an ethical impact assessment; a comprehensive approach for ethically assessing the actual and potential mid- and long-term impacts of research and innovation on society. The document contains also terms and definitions; a description of the phases of ethical assessment and of the possible tools to be used.

Part of interest: See in particular part 2.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs

 

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This Manual has been drafted by the ADAPT Centre & Trinity College Dublin and the Dublin City University (by Lewis, Reijers, Pandit) in 2017. The Manual allows researchers to reflect on the ethical impacts of their works by using the provided forms and templates. In particular, it might help to brainstorm about the ethical implications of a project and representing them in a Canvas; to analyse the ethical concerns of a project and find a similar solution. It contains also the proposal to join the Ethics Canvas community. There is also an online version of the Ethics Canvas Manual.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs

 

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This UNI/PdR sets out all useful criteria so that the organisations may carry out the innovation process in a responsible manner, i.e., aimed at the improvement of the quality of life, according to the interested parties’ expectations, and at the same time be environmentally, socially and economically sustainable. The approach is based on the following principles: description of the phases; risk management; applying the precautionary principle; identifying, reviewing, and managing the indicators; identifying the objectives; reviewing the performance of indicators; the relationships with all the actors involved in the innovation value chain; dissemination.

Part of interest: The entire document. It contains also the templates and questionnaires to be used for applying it.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs

 

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The guidelines describe the most frequent legal and regulatory challenges of European SMEs, with particular regard, among others, to privacy protection and GDPR requirements and IPR. This is one of the smart guides provided by eHealth Hub.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Start-ups

 

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InFieri is a research program that focuses on Responsible Innovation in Health (RIH) carried out by the University of Montreal in Canada (Quebec, Ontario) and in Brazil (state of São Paulo). The RIH Assessment Tool was developed and validated by InFieri to assess responsibility in health innovation. In particular, it might be used by policymakers and providers to assess whether an innovation qualifies as a Responsible Innovation in Health (RIH). A User Guide has been developed to facilitate the application of the Tool. Drawing on RRI and health policy research, the RIH Tool entails a three-step process: screening, assessment, and rating. The value domains and attributes used for the assessment of innovation includes among others, also, ethical, legal, and social issues; health inequalities; frugality; eco-responsibility; inclusiveness.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Innovation business, RPOs

 

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The document presents how the thematic Lab on biomedicine was run in Spain for the biomedicine sector, in the framework of Innovation Compass Project (Deliverable D2.4). The Lab consisted in a series of online and in-person meetings to develop a sectorial roadmap to help SMEs in the health sector to embed RRI in their practices. An important central issue of the Lab on Biomedicine is the ethical imperative of care and to recognise the need to afford greater choice for people in managing their health (and their access to technologies that help them do this). Such issues are noted as impacting on the designs of products (e.g., ‘safe by design’) and service configurations whereby users (patients) are empowered. It follows then, that the roadmap requires companies to have and implement appropriate codes of practice that help to embed an appropriate service ethos – and that related technologies are designed to support this.

Part of interest: In particular, the Roadmap.

Target groups: Innovation Business

 

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The Project My Health My data (this resource is the Deliverable D7.4) is focused on a new paradigm in Data privacy e data security in Health and in particular on Blockchain technology for innovation in (digital) health and privacy, preserving big data technologies in health. Issues of data subjects’ privacy and data security represent a crucial challenge in the biomedical sector more than in other industries. The current IT landscape in this field shows a myriad of isolated, locally hosted patient data repositories. MyHealthMyData (MHMD) aims at changing the existing scenario by introducing a distributed, peer-to-peer architecture, based on Blockchain and Personal Data Accounts. The document presents the results of a consultation of users/citizens about their needs and expectations on the new approach on health data by citizens. This resource might provide suggestions to be taken into account in setting up, implementing innovation and tools requiring the collection and management of citizen health data.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, Patients and CSOs, Innovation business, RPOs

 

Section D

Adoption, Implementation and Deployment of Innovation Solutions

Section D1

Solution Implementation

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The second episode of the “CHERRIES webinar series 2020 Exploring responsible healthcare ecosystems in Europe” was devoted to a reflection on “RRI practices in healthcare”, with the contribution of two experts: Rosina Malagrida, Head of the Living Lab for Health at IrsiCaixa & Co-coordinator of the Barcelona “la Caixa” Living Lab, and Barbara Kieslinger, Coordinator of Careables.org and Project Manager at the Centre for Social Innovation – ZSI, Vienna.

Part of interest: The entire webinar.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

 

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Digital Health Europe provides comprehensive, integrated, and centralised support to the Digital Health and Care Innovation initiative in the context of the Digital Single Market Strategy. The project’s approach involves a number of actions that will boost innovation and advance the Digital Single Market priorities for the digital transformation of health and care (DTHC). The Platform contains practices of a digital solution in healthcare, including those related to the management of healthcare for Covid-19 pandemic.

Part of interest: The entire catalogue.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professional, Patients, CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries, Payers

 

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UBORA is a platform for open-source co-design of new solutions to face the current and future global healthcare challenges, by exploiting networking, knowledge on rapid prototyping of new ideas, and sharing of safety criteria and performance data. UBORA (“excellence” in Swahili) brings together European and African Universities and their associated technological hubs (supporting biomedical prototyping laboratories and incubators), national and international policymakers, and committed and credible stakeholders propelled by a series of Design Schools and Competitions.

Part of interest: The entire platform.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Providers, Patients, CSOs, Higher Education Institutions

 

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It is an online Platform where patients and caregivers around the world share the solutions they have developed also with the help of collaborators (other caregivers, professionals, etc) to cope with a health-related problem. The platform contains more than 150 solutions provided by people coming from more than 80 countries. The portal contains also a section devoted to COVID 19, including solutions concerning mobile apps, protective equipment, lung ventilator, websites, electronic devices, etc.

Part of interest: The entire platform.

Target groups: Innovation business, CSOs, Patients, Providers, Professionals, RPOs

 

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ACTIVAGE is a European Multi Centric Large-Scale Pilot on Smart Living Environments. The main objective is to build the first European IoT ecosystem across 9 Deployment Sites (DS) in seven European countries, reusing, scaling up, and integrating underlying open and proprietary IoT platforms, technologies, and standards. The specific aim is to provide interoperability across these heterogeneous platforms, enabling the deployment and operation at the large scale of Active & Healthy Ageing IoT based solutions and services, supporting and extending the independent living of older adults in their living environments, and responding to real needs of caregivers, service providers, and public authorities. The guidelines address the need at this moment of the deployment of the ACTIVAGE pilots of collecting and documenting a series of experiences that can be translated into a series of recommendations for the replication of the same in another series of projects.

Part of interest: See in particular, paragraphs 4.1., 4.2., 5.3., and chapter 6.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Providers, Patients, CSOs, Policymakers

 

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The resource contains stories of the application of the InDemand Project model in the three regions of Murcia (Spain), Paris (France) and Oulu (Finland): describing the challenges and the solutions implemented. Each region has identified specific challenges to be addressed by the solution proposed by the applicants. The resource describes for each story the challenges identified, the co-created solutions, and the participants that made it possible. The solutions are being implemented by healthcare providers and institutions.

Part of interest: The entire document. In particular, see Gravidity; A3D and Arno and Anonymous.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Providers, Professionals, Patients, Payers

 

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MARIE is an Interreg project involving 8 EU regions. Its objective is to improve regional public policy that supports the delivery of RRI to enterprises’ product, process, and service design, production, and distribution and promote the integration of RRI approach (key and dimensions) in organisations. MARIE achieves this aim through exchanging experiences on 3 types of support action contained in the RRI framework: Quadruple Helix; Open Innovation; Information & Tools for RRI application. Using interregional activities, communication, and stakeholder engagement, partners develop Action Plans that result in: improved policy instruments; more and better-targeted funding for RRI delivery; increased capacity among innovation actors; consolidated partnerships of quadruple helix innovation chain stakeholders. The resource describes the implemented practices, and the impacts already produced in the 8 regions.

Part of interest: The entire resource.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Start-ups, Intermediary organisations

 

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The main objective of the ROSIE Project was to use transnational cooperation to improve skills among entrepreneurs and innovation actors to promote RRI in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Central Europe. Results of the project are tools and training modules to improve RRI capacity, with a comprehensive RRI strategy and transnational pilots to test tools and strategic proposals. The main outputs of the ROSIE project are the road maps and national pilots. The resource describes the approach and methods followed in the pilots for embedding RRI: UNI/PdR, STIR, Living Lab, used COMPASS RRI self-Check tool.

Part of interest: See in particular the part devoted to approach and methods.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Policymakers, Intermediaries, Start-ups, Intermediary organisations

 

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The document (Region de Murcia, 2017) describes the strategy to foster innovative entrepreneurship based on the STEM vocation for the period 2018-2021. The strategy for the period 2018-2021 presents some changes with respect to the precedent strategy: coordination and communication; community and society; cooperation and labour; learning; enterprises; innovation, science, technology, and development; empowerment; entrepreneurship.

Part of interest: The whole document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Policy makers

 

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This document (TeRRItoria Project, Deliverable D3.2, 2019) is an Inventory of 43 RRI Governance Innovation Practices, detected in 15 RRI projects conducted in Europe and beyond, proposing relevant and new models of RRI governance innovation practices. Based on the analysis of the 15 RRI projects, the report underlies the reflexive and the context-depended nature of RRI, requiring for its integration a tailored approach that needs to take into account the existing problems, the aspired future situations, as well as the agency and the capacities of the actors (individuals, or organisations). The summary contains a list of possible practices and approaches that might be inspiring in applying RRI (gender equality, public engagement, science education, and open access) and a list of practices adopting a unified approach on RRI.

Part of interest: The entire document, and in particular the summary.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Professional, Patients and CSOs, RPOs, Innovative business, intermediaries

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The Foster Portal is an online collection of training materials on RRI and Open Science. In particular, it contains: an integrated RRI and OS taxonomy and a knowledge repository showing resources linked to RRI in different subcategories (videos, tutorials, and guidelines).

Part of interest: The entire portal.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business. Higher Education Institution

 

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INNOVCare aimed at researching integrated care pathways for rare disease patients, bridging gaps between social and healthcare, and facilitating the organisation of everyday life for them and their families. The report (Deliverable D9.5, 2018) presents the theoretical and methodological framework of the up-scaling process and the way for adopting and implementing social innovation in other contexts. Up-scaling describes the effort to increase the impact of (social) innovations.

Part of interest: In particular, see from Pg. 8 to 12 and from Pg. 36 to 58.

Target groups: Policymakers, Patients, Providers, RPOs

 

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The document (by Mulgan, and Sanders, 2007) addressed the issue of social innovation: what it is (new ideas that meet unmet needs); who do it (politics and government, markets, movements, academia, and social enterprises); how the stages of social innovation happen; linear and not linear process of social innovation; the innovation stages performed by different actors; the future of social innovation. Social innovation happens in different fields and is promoted by different kinds of actors (not only the non-profit sector). The theoretical discourse is accompanied by a description of stories and experiences.

Part of interest: The summary (Pp. 4-7) and the stages of social innovation (Pp. 21-34).

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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The paper is focused on innovation, considering four main strands of research, studying innovation at the organisational, systemic, sectoral, and macroeconomic levels. Several fundamental issues are explored, such as the co-evolution between technological and institutional change; the role of demand; and the impacts of innovation on individual and collective welfare. There are also important methodological challenges, such as the need for more systematic interactions between the different levels of analysis; the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to the study of technological and institutional changes; and the search for a combination of contingent explanations based on case studies with general analytical results based on econometric and formal models. The article describes also the regional network of innovation actors.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business

 

Section D2

RRI and Responsible Innovation in practice

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This is a paper (by Silva, Lehoux, Miller, and Denis, 2018) inspiring the experience of InFieri. It describes the components of the RIH framework, based on the literature on RRI and health innovations. In particular, the framework integrated the RRI characteristics of addressing societal needs and challenges; engaging a range of stakeholders to improve decision-making and mutual learning; anticipating potential problems, assessing available alternatives and reflecting on underlying values, assumptions and beliefs; and providing guidance on ways to act following the previous principles; with the three other criteria of innovativeness, health relevance and subsidiarity. Using these criteria, the authors set up an inventory of around 100 innovations in health matching RIH criteria.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Policymakers, CSOs

 

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InFieri is a research program that focuses on Responsible Innovation in Health (RIH) carried out by the University of Montreal in Canada (Quebec, Ontario) and in Brazil (state of São Paulo). The RIH Assessment Tool was developed and validated by InFieri to assess responsibility in health innovation. In particular, it might be used by policymakers and providers to assess whether an innovation is qualified as a Responsible Innovation in Health (RIH). Drawing on RRI and health policy research, the RIH Tool entails a three-step process: screening, assessment, and rating. The RIH assessment Tool includes four inclusion and exclusion criteria, nine assessment attributes, and a scoring system. The resource contains the User Guide developed to facilitate the application of the Tool.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Innovation business, RPOs

 

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This is an article (by Demers-Payette, Lehoux, and Daudelin, 2016) presenting the outcomes of three mixed focus groups, involving users of medical technology (patients, clinicians), developers (engineers, designers), and innovation managers (of universities, in hospitals, and in biomedical firms) about the issues RRI and innovation in health. It is aimed at identifying needs and challenges in the healthcare system, by a discussion on the four RRI dimensions (inclusion, anticipation, reflexivity, responsiveness). The resource provides useful suggestions for the further development of responsible medical innovation.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs, Patients and CSOs, Providers, Professionals, Payers

 

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This article (by Fraaije and Flipse, 2019) proposes an implementation framework of responsible research and organisation in SMEs, based on the operationalisation of the RRI dimensions − i.e., inclusion, anticipation, reflexivity, and responsiveness. The framework, mainly addressed to engineers and practitioners, is based on a literature review. The resulting framework integrates a set of qualifiers that are central to the concept of ‘responsive’ research and innovation, from the point of view of the process of innovation and the point of view of the product. These are the qualifiers for the innovation process: transparency, inclusion, reflexivity, anticipation, responsiveness. The framework also allows the identification of ‘RRI shortcuts’ to be avoided.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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The PRISMA Project involved social science researchers and technologists from five different research organisations around the EU talking to eight technology industries about Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). The goal was to draw specific lessons about how RRI can be implemented in practice in the industry. The document presents two different approaches in embedding RRI: an approach focused on external support to industry; and an approach based on the embedding of ethicists in the research team. The document describes the activities implemented by the Project in the 8 industries on how to embed RRI approach in their innovation programs.

Part of interest: From Pg. 19 to 50; from Pg. 57 to 63.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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The Guide (drafted in the framework of Responsible industry Project) provides strategic options and recommendations to be considered on a case-by-case basis by industrial actors engaged in research and innovation to pursue responsible practices and behaviours when developing devices, products, and services. In particular, the Guide contains a Framework to implement RRI, developed on the basis of research undertaken by companies that are active in research and innovation in the domain of ICT. The Framework operationalises RRI in companies dealing with ICT for an ageing society addresses four main questions: Who is responsible for what? How can RRI be integrated along the value chain? What voluntary tools can be used for RRI? How can ethical and social impact analysis be performed?

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular the part of the Framework (Pp. 8-22).

Target groups: Innovation Business, RPOs

 

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This is an article (by Van de Poel et al., 2017) focused on how companies can integrate RRI (and mainly its 4 dimensions) into their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) policies and business strategy. The authors developed a conceptual model that links a company’s RRI strategy to its context, and that helps to translate the RRI strategy into activities that result in RRI outcomes. A process for developing company-specific RRI key performance indicators (KPIs) that can support companies to measure RRI outcomes is also described. The framework distinguishes four main elements, namely context, strategic level, operational level, and RRI outcomes.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs

 

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This is an article tied with the CareConnect Project eHealth innovations in the Twente Region (by Konrad, Greiving, and Benneworth, 2018) and focused on the innovation process of an eHealth application, which emerged as a user-driven, local project. The eHealth application is based on a communication platform that creates a network around a particular patient, who needs regular care, including the different parties involved in the patient’s care; and aimed at facilitating the communication and coordination of this care network. The authors trace the innovation and implementation process, and explore, firstly, to which extent and in which form different dimensions of responsibility are presented along the innovation process. Secondly, they consider if and how the regional and partly local, bottom-up nature of the innovation network, was conducive to enacting the dimensions of responsibility. The article also describes the composition and function of the network.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Providers, Professionals, RPOs, Policymakers, Innovation business, Patients, CSOs

 

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The RRI Health Award is an initiative carried out in the framework of Project Orion, focused on promoting open science by the implementation of co-creation activities and training. The context included six modalities of participation (one for each RRI Key): ethics, governance, gender equality, open access, public engagement (here called “public commitment”), and health education, with a concept that seeks to encourage active participation and involvement of society in science and innovation from the earliest stages of research projects to ensure that future results are as aligned as possible with societal needs. Orion website contains also a menu of co-creation methods (Deliverable D3.1.).

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institutions, Payers

 

Section D3

Pre-commercial procurement: a possible way for innovation to market access

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The third episode of the “CHERRIES webinar series 2020 Exploring responsible healthcare ecosystems in Europe” was focused on “The role of procurement in healthcare innovation” with the contribution of John Rigby and Samuli Kauppinen, with a reflection on whether the innovation frameworks are changing towards more responsible and sustainable approaches and with a reflection on the question if the rules and the framework are ready enough to support this cultural change and to cope with the complexity of the health sector.

Part of interest: The entire webinar.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, CSO, Innovation Business, Funding organisations, Intermediaries, Higher Education Institutions

 

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The resource is the web page of the European Commission on Pre-Commercial Public Procurement. This is the UE definition: “PCP enables public procurers to compare alternative potential solution approaches and filter out the best possible solutions that the market can deliver to address the public need. Public procurers can drive innovation from the demand side by acting as technologically demanding customers that buy the development and testing of new solutions.” Apart from IPR issues, PCPs produce benefits such as developing innovative solutions for the societal challenges of the future; facilitate the access of new innovative players to the public procurement market; share the risks and benefits of designing, prototyping, and testing new products and services between procurers and suppliers; improving the conditions for wider commercialisation and take-up of R&D results. PCP might be followed by the adoption of the Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions (PPI). “Public Procurement of Innovative solutions (PPI) happens when the public sector uses its purchasing power to act as early adopter of innovative solutions which are not yet available on large scale commercial basis”.

Part of interest: The entire platform.

Target groups: Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business, Patients, Policymakers, Start-ups, Intermediary organisations

 

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PiPPi is an EU Project coordinated by The Center for Innovation at the Karolinska University Hospital to innovate procurement of digital health and care services, by establishing an active Community of Practice (CoP) of people, who wish to learn something by collaborating with other members of the group both in real and virtual world; and sharing goals, interests, information, and experiences. The CoP is composed of policymakers, payers, enablers, industry, healthcare providers/hospitals, the research community, patients. The CoP has been involved in the process of identifying and formulating unmet needs in the digital healthcare and service area. This process was the basis for the activation of the PCP/PIPPI procedures. The works on unmet needs and their prioritisation is a loop process.

Part of interest: The entire platform.

Target groups: Professionals, RPOs, Innovation Business, Patients, Policymakers

 

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ProEmpower is a PCP project to buy R&D (research and development) services to improve the treatment and the self-management of diabetes type 2 patients using a Personalised Diabetes Management Solution. The solution has to be interoperable with respect to the existing systems of the pilot regions. The PCP includes the following steps: Open Market consultation (by webinars, focus groups); a call for tender; the implementation of phase I, by the definition of the concept design, the solution architecture and technical specification; the implementation of phase II, by the development of a prototype system in two iterations; the deployment of phase III, by the development and testing of a pilot system. The solutions have to apply the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) principles and the patients’ data processing rights.

Part of interest: The entire itinerary.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Policy Makers, Start-ups, RPOs, Providers, Patients

 

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The RELIEF project – recovering life wellbeing through pain self-management techniques involving information and communication technologies (ICTs) – is a PCP project funded by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 program. In this case, the challenge/need to be addressed by the solution requires more research. The challenge has been presented to industry/SMEs in an Open Market Consultation. A European call for tender of the solution has been launched. Then the PCP procedures started. The PCP of RELIEF includes the following phase: phase 1 solution design; phase 2 prototype development; phase 3 pre-commercial small scale productive/service development − field test ad comparison for selecting the 2 best solutions; phase 4 Commercialisation diffusion of product/service.

Part of interest: The entire documents.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, start-ups

 

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This paper (by Haukipure, Vainamo, and Torvinen, 2016) examines Public Procurement, aiming to increase understanding of how the living lab approach and end-user involvement create innovativeness and enhance public procurement results, providing effective and better solutions. The empirical findings are based on a real-life unique Public Procurement in the healthcare field where the living lab approach was used through the product testing phase, which was included in the procurement procedure. The selected group of users performed product testing in a real homecare environment. The quality of the product based on product testing played a significant role for the first time in public healthcare-related procurement in the City of Oulu, Finland. In this case, the winning solution was not the most inexpensive but the one obtaining the highest quality scores by users.

Part of interest: The entire article is useful because innovates the public procurement process with the introduction of living labs.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Patients, Providers, Payers, CSOs

 

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This document was produced in the framework of the UNCAP Project (Deliverable D5.2., 2017). The deliverable describes relevant new public procurement models used in the public sectors that can be accommodated for future exploitation of the healthcare market by UNCAP. The document is based on the results of desk research and on the experiences carried out by the UNCAP project.

Part of interest: Download the Deliverable D5.2 and see the part devoted to the public procurement in each EU country and the conclusion.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Policy Makers, Start-ups, RPOs

 

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This is a paper (by Faurholt-Jepsen et al., 2019) related to the PCP EU project of NYMPHA-MD focused on support to people with bipolar disorders. During the PCP carried out in the framework NYMPHA-MD project, two Smartphone-based monitoring systems were developed by two IT companies, and their solutions were selected among other companies’ innovative solutions during the PCP to be tested. The resource presents the multi-center pilot study carried out to examine the feasibility and usability of these systems (the Pulso system and the Trilogis-Monsenso system) for patients with bipolar disorder, developed and selected to be tested.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Policy Makers, Start-ups, RPOs, Providers, Professionals

 

Section D4

Commercialisation

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In the framework of European E-Health Business Support, eHealth Hub is an EU-funded initiative, exclusively focused on digital health, providing long-term support to the stakeholder ecosystems and addressing key challenges of European SMEs: fine-tuning a business model, securing investments, engaging the demand-side, and accelerating commercialisation, getting legal and regulatory guidance to develop solutions in compliance with a multi-layer complex framework. eHealth Hub’s goal is to provide business-oriented services tailored to the needs of eHealth SMEs and stakeholders and to secure their continuation after the project end via a sustainable support structure. The resource contains various smart guides.

Part of interest: The entire resource.

Target groups: Innovation business, Providers, RPOs, Start-ups, Intermediaries

 

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This is a practical introductory manual on business modelling and routes to market, drafted in the framework of GET project (2015). The Guide presents some approaches to business development in the sector of health. In particular, the Guide presents three approaches: business model Canvas, the lean start-up methodology, and the continuous improvement methods. Tools and resources are also included. Each approach is discussed individually to offer an outline structure and a fundamental level of understanding, together with links to tools, literature, and case studies for further details and references to help the application of these methods and to help the achievement of best success to eHealth start-ups.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Start-ups, Intermediaries, Payers

 

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On the basis of an analysis of a Single Digital Market (2015), the resource provides lessons learned from investors on the situation of digital health. In particular, the resource describes the investment framework in eHealth, with data and interviews with investors (GET project made interviews with more than 250 investors in digital health). The resource contains the list of criteria adopted to be taken into consideration by SMEs and start-ups in a self-assessment exercise on three areas of issues: when a company is ready for its next step; a product that is a solution; a company ready for its next round of investment. The resource contains also a list of potential investors in eHealth.

Part of interest: The entire document, and in particular from Pg 16.

Target groups: Innovation Business, Start-ups, Intermediaries, Payers

 

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This is a paper (by Van Velthon and Cordon, 2017) describing the outcomes of a workshop on health stakeholders on driving factors, obstacles, and conflicts related to the adoption of digital health innovation.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Business Innovation, Providers, Professionals, CSOs, Patients

 

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CIMIT (Consortia for improving medicine with the Innovation and technology) defined a set of instruments to support healthcare innovation technology development. The starting point is the healthcare tech innovation cycle (composed of three main phases: Invention, Translation, and Commercialisation), establishing a sequence of healthcare-specific milestones. In this context was created a roadmap to guide teams for navigating the complex journey from an unmet clinical need to the becoming standard of care; and able to address clinical, market/business, regulatory, and technology risks. The elements of the cycle are: clinical need; idea; proof of concept; proof of feasibility; proof of value; initial clinical trials; validation of solution; approval and launch; clinical use; standard of care. Several other instruments delivered from CIMIT are included in this resource.

Part of interest: The entire resource.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Start-ups

 

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Guidance and Impact Tracking System (GAITS) platform is designed to assist the commercialisation of healthcare innovations. This is a free educational resource site to help teams who are developing healthcare innovations to plan their work in a way that maximizes the chances for success by using CIMIT’s Healthcare Innovation Cycle framework. It is composed of a series of Deliverables grouped by maturity (10 “Innovation Maturity Levels”) and topic areas (4 Domains), creating 40 Cells. Each Cell is divided into segments that represent a Deliverable. This tool was prepared for four types of solutions: health tech, med-tech, digital medicine, and biomarker diagnostic.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Providers, Start-ups

 

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The resource contains the tools of technology readiness level (TRL) and of the Market readiness level (MRL). The corresponding efforts made to set up and test a technological product has to be made for supporting the process to bring those products to market, providing an organic sustainable plan and an exploitation strategy. This support includes business strategy, business modelling, marketing, sales, after-sales support, service desks, IT service management systems, supply chain management, staff training and education, business change, and transition. TLR and MRL might be very useful in the process of the market access of a product.

Part of interest: Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Business Innovation

 

Section E

Establishing practices and methods for evaluation

Section E1

Assessment of the embedment of RRI

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This is a UNESCO document that codifies the goals and value systems by which science operates, adopted by all its member states in November 2017. The UNESCO Recommendation on Science and Scientific Researchers (RSSR) entails ten key priority areas for its global implementation and four-yearly monitoring. They re-affirmed legal commitments to guarantee scientific freedom, ensure public engagement with science, support the ‘human right to science’, establish equitable and sustainable workforces and pipelines, and many other valuable standards and norms that are meant to guide science equally everywhere. They set out a scientists’ bill of rights and agreed on scientists’ autonomy, responsibility, freedoms, and minimum working conditions. These standards are now meant to apply to researchers worldwide, whether in public, private, or higher education.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher education institutions, CSOs

 

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This is the Introduction of the book “Assessment of Responsible Innovation. Methods and practices” (by van de Poel, 2020). It explores methods and practices for the assessment of RRI. RRI aims to encourage societal actors to work together during all phases of the research and innovation (R&I) process to better align R&I and its outcomes with the values, needs, and expectations of society. Assessing the benefits and costs of RRI is thus crucial for furthering the responsible conduct of science, technology, and innovation.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: RPOs, Payors, Innovation Business, Higher education institutions, CSOs

 

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The European Commission has started in the framework of the topic H2020-14-2018-2019 a common reflection on evaluation and assessment procedures and methods to be adopted in supporting the development of territorial RRI. The challenge is to set up a shared way to assess territorial RRI impacts. The resource is the presentation by Cristina Morcone (EC officer) at the starting event of this reflection. The presentation describes the project evaluation criteria for excellence, impact (regarding the MoRRI indicators and the Sustainable Development Goals), and implementation.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education institutions, Policymakers, Payers

 

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EU MoRRI project (carried out from 2014-2018) provides scientific evidence, data analysis, and policy intelligence to support the European Commission in relation to RRI. In particular, MoRRI operationalises the RRI concept and its six keys, develops a sound conceptual framework and associate methodologies; and tests the potential of this methodology to allow monitoring the current state and short-term evolution of RRI. Then, MoRRI defined a list of 36 indicators that have to be applied for assessing the impacts of RRI practices. The link contains the publications of the reports with the indicators. In compliance with the aims of MoRRI, all indicators target the country level, even though most of them are based on data aggregated from the level of institutions or individuals.

Part of interest: The entire document and in particular the list of the 36 indicators.

Target groups: Innovation business, Policymakers, RPOs, Higher Educations Institutions, CSOs

 

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The thinking Tool (New HoRRIzon Project, Deliverable D6.1, 2018) offers practical guidance for researchers who wish to mature the societal readiness of their work. The primary goal is to help researchers to align their project activities with societal needs and expectations. The thinking Tool asks reflective questions to stimulate thinking about how to integrate ideas about RRI into research practice, at different stages in the project life.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs (mainly), Innovation Business, Higher Education institutions

 

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This self-assessment tool is one of the main tools of the RRI Tools platform, which contains also hundreds of resources and documents on RRI (to be used also for training on RRI). For each RRI policy agenda, the Tool includes tailored questions useful for starting a self-reflection, considering who is the respondent (research community, policymakers, education community, business & industry, civil society organisations). The use of the Tool helps the team in designing a process or project in line with RRI principle or for assessing the compliance of their activity/project with the RRI approach. The questions of the self-reflection Tool can be also downloaded, for working offline. The platform contains also a guide on how to use the tool.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institutions, CSOs

 

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This is a paper (by Kalpazidou Schmidt, 2019) on the monitoring and assessment procedures designed and used in the framework of STARBIO2 Project actions plans implemented in biosciences research organisations. Monitoring and assessment criteria were the following: effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, sustainability, transferability, and impact. The assessment and monitoring procedures have been based on a collection of documents and information and of bilateral meetings. The document is Note #12 of the “RRI Implementation in Bioscience organisations” presented in the Guidelines from the STARBIOS2 project.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovations business, Higher education institutions

 

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The NUCLEUS project focuses on identifying key factors for the successfully embedment of RRI in academic practices. The Implementation Roadmap (Deliverable D3.6, 2017) introduces steps and actions to install 10 embedded Nuclei and 20 mobile Nuclei as innovative and reflective RRI test-beds. NUCLEUS approach foreseen the use of a self-assessment tool by the Nucleus, starting from the beginning of the process and to carry out a SWOT analysis of the situation. Setting up a RRI Nucleus foreseen 8 actions, the last one is devoted to embed ongoing reflection, analyse processes, and procedures for monitoring and evaluating progress during the implementation (phase 8).

Part of interest: See in particular, Pp. 42-43 on monitoring and evaluation; Pp. 63-67 on the use of MoRRI indicators and the appendices.

Target groups: Policymakers, Patients and CSO, RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institutions, Intermediaries, Providers

 

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The COMPASS Responsible Innovation self-check Tool aims to help Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in highly innovative sectors to learn how to effectively integrate Responsible Innovation practices (RI) into their company and innovation management. For accessing it is necessary to register. The self-check Tool is described in the paper “The COMPASS self-check Tool. Enhancing organisational learning for responsible innovation through self-assessment”.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: Innovation Business

 

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This document (2019) provides guidelines to develop long-term strategies (roadmaps) to innovate responsibly, integrating technical, ethical, social, environmental, and economic issues into research and innovation practices. The focus is on transformative and enabling technologies. The road mapping includes 6 steps: commitment and leadership; context analysis; materiality, experiment and engage; validate; road map design. The sixth step on validation is aimed at the evaluation and validation of the added value of the Road map in terms of its impact on the product development and on the company on the basis of some criteria. The resource includes also: the RRI key performance indicators.

Part of interest: See in particular, Section 6.6. “Validation”, the table on ISO standards and RRI, the list of KPIs, the list of criteria for the evaluation exercise.

Target groups: Innovation business, Start-ups

 

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The RRI self-assessment Tool for innovation and research organisations can be used as a starting point for an institutional change process. ORBIT set up a Framework to be adopted to include RRI principles in ICT activities of SMEs. The Framework is articulated in four areas: Anticipate, Reflect, Engage, Act − AREA. The Tool is tied with the implementation of the Framework. The Tool requires free registration.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business

 

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This is the Responsible Innovation RI In-depth Assessment Tool template set up in the framework of the Interreg ROSIE Project for helping the SMEs to reflect on responsible innovation themes, their level of implementation within the organisations, and on the definition of a plan for the improvement of innovation practices to make them more sustainable, socially accountable, and competitive. The tool guides the reflection by providing questions organised according to the EU RRI Policy Agendas: Ethics, Gender Equality, Governance, Open Access, Public Engagement, and Science Education.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Start-ups

 

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This paper (by Lehoux, Silva, Oliveira, and Rivard, 2020) is focused on the relationship between formative self-assessment tools and summative external assessment approach in helping entrepreneurs to integrate RRI principles into their practices. Usually, the summative external approach received little attention. This study addresses this gap by applying the Responsible Innovation in Health (RIH) Tool, which adopted an external assessment approach, to 16 health innovations from Canada and Brazil.

Part of interest: The entire article.

Target groups: Innovation business, RPOs, Higher education institutions

 

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The Responsible Innovation in Health RIH Assessment Tool was developed and validated by InFieri Project to assess responsibility in health innovation. In particular, it might be used by policymakers and providers to assess whether an innovation might be qualified as a Responsible Innovation in Health (RIH). A User Guide has been developed to facilitate the application of the Tool. Drawing on RRI and health policy research, the RIH Tool entails a three-step process assessment of an innovation: screening (with respect of the RIH criteria), assessment of the presence of responsibility features through nine attributes; and rating, determining the outcomes of the assessment with the help of scorecards.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, Innovation business, RPOs, Professionals, Patients

 

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Responsibility Navigator is a self-reflecting tool for supporting decision-makers within research organisation (RPOs, RFOs, Industries, etc) towards more responsiveness and accountability. The tool, set up in the framework of ResAgora Project, supports those decision-makers as ‘change agents’ to work as ‘institutional entrepreneurs’, seeking to lead the R&I performed in Europe in the direction of more responsiveness. The Res-AGorA Responsibility Navigator offers support and guidance for reflecting on and intervening in decision making and negotiation processes to fund and orientate R&I activities, whereby these processes can be located within or between organisations.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Payers, Higher education institutions

 

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This is the Interactive tool to assess the institution’s support needs for public engagement, provided by the UK National Co-ordination Centre for Public Engagement. The EDGE Tool was created to help universities assess their current support for public engagement, and to identify areas where they would like to see change. The self-assessment tool identifies three macro areas of public engagement: the area of purpose (including the issues of mission, leadership, and communication); the area of the process (including the issues of support, learning, and recognition); and the area of people (including staff, students and public). The tool identifies also the following dimensions: Embryonic; Developing; Gripping; Embedding.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: Policymakers, Providers, RPOs, Business Innovation, High Education Institutions

 

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The resource addresses the central question as to whether citizen engagement in knowledge production could enable inclusive health policymaking. Building on non-health work fields, the authors describe different types of citizen engagement in scientific research, or ‘Citizen Science’. The article describes the challenges that Citizen Science poses for public health, and how these could be addressed. The resource provides also a draft framework to enable the evaluation of Citizen Science in practice, consisting of a descriptive typology of different kinds of Citizen Science and a causal framework that shows how Citizen Science in public health might benefit both the knowledge produced as well as the ‘Citizen Scientists’ as active participants.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs, Policymakers,

 

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This is a paper (by Souliotis et al., 2016) describing the application Health Democracy Index (HDI) to assess the level of participation of patient associations in policy decision-making in Cyprus. The questionnaire used was comprised of two parts, a socio-demographic section, and the Health Democracy Index. The HDI shows to be efficacy in assessing the participation of patient associations.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, CSOs, Policymakers, Providers, Professionals

 

Section E2

Assessment of Gender equality in organizations

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LIBRA is an EC-funded project which brought together ten research institutes in life sciences in ten European countries that realised ten Gender Equality Plans. In this framework, LIBRA set up a Guide for evaluating the gender situation in Faculty and promoting a fair and gender-inclusive situation. The Guide provides also practical advice to remove gender bias starting from the recruitment process, for raising the number of female scientists in top-level positions.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institutes, Innovation Business

 

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The Workplace Gender Equality Agency’s (‘WGEA’ or ‘Agency’) Gender Equality Diagnostic Tool (2019) helps to analyse the status of gender equality and pinpoint gender equality gaps within an organisation. It can be used with the Gender Equality Strategy Guide to assist with the development of a strategy for addressing inequalities.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, Patients and CSOs, Providers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Intermediaries, Payers

 

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The Gender Equality in Academia and Research (GEAR) Tool provides universities and research organisations with practical advice and tools through all stages of institutional change: from setting up a gender equality plan to evaluating its real impact. The tool has been defined by EIGE – European Institute for Gender Equality. The Tool contains also examples and resources. The GEAR foresees the implementation of six steps: 1. Getting started; 2 analysing and assessing the state-of-play in the institution; 3. Setting up a gender equality plan; 4 implementing a gender equality plan; 5. Monitoring progress and evaluating a gender equality plan; 6. What comes after the gender equality plan? A Guide for using GEAR is available on the platform.

Part of interest: See in particular Step 2 and Step 5.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education institutions

 

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This “Reflection Tool” is a six-page document that can be printed and used to facilitate fruitful reflection and discussion on vision, goals, and implementation of RRI initiatives in smaller groups. It was initially developed as part of the GRACE Project where six research performing and funding organisations develop and implement Grounding Actions to strengthen responsible practices in their organisation or network. The Tool can, however, be used by anyone who wants to experiments with such efforts for instance at the beginning of a new project. It is meant to help a working group in its general reflection on what it wishes to achieve, in setting measurable success criteria for the sake of monitoring and evaluation, and in project management by planning the steps of implementation, foreseeing potential obstacles, and reflecting on needed resources.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education institutions

 

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The Guidelines (Trigger Project, Deliverable D7.5, 2017) provided orientations and analyses to manage what may happen when, in a given research organisation, a gender action plan is launched (be it promoted by a specific project team, the HR Department, the Rector, the Head of a department or other internal stakeholders). The Guidelines took into account also a wider debate on institutional change towards gender equality involving representatives of other 8 EC-funded structural change projects. The Guidelines are articulated in four macro-areas: transformational agent; activation and mobilisation; making an impact; and sustainability.

Part of interest: See in particular area #3 “Making an impact” and 4 “Sustainability”.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education Institute

 

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This paper (by Palmen et al., 2019) provides an overview of the theoretical assumptions, methods, and key results from the Evaluation Framework for Promoting Gender Equality in Research and Innovation (EFFORTI) Project, which was funded by the European Commission. The purpose of EFFORTI was to analyse the impact of interventions to promote gender equality in research and innovation (R&I) and to establish criteria for more responsible and responsive research and innovation (RRI) systems in Europe. This paper provides an overview of the project’s main results and the lessons learned from the empirical analysis of R&I systems in several European countries and a comparison of 19 gender equality intervention measures (case studies). The article summarises the lessons learned and the recommendations for measuring gender equality.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education institutions

 

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The document (Stages Project, Deliverable D8.3, 2015) contains a description of action plans for promoting institutional change towards equal opportunity in science and a list of 20 useful recommendations for implementing structural change action plans, articulated in the following areas: collecting data and monitoring gender equality; engaging leadership; policy-making and institutionalisation; networking and empowering women to take action; integrating gender in education and research; communication and visibility.

Part of interest: See in particular recommendations #4 and #5.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education Institution

 

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The article (by Henderson et al., 2020) describes the survey carried out online to assess and monitor significant progress in gender equity (GE) to be eligible to apply for funding in Biomedical Research Centres (BRC). This is the first survey tool designed to rank and identify new GE markers specific to the NIHR BRCs.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Higher Education institutions

 

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The resource has been made in the context of ACT Project and represents the deliverable D2.1. The Gender Equality Audit and Monitoring (GEAM) tool provides an integrated environment for carrying out survey-based gender equality audit in organisations (e.g., university or research performing organisation) or organisational units (faculty, departments). The GEAM tool is based upon the Athena Survey of Science, Engineering, and Technology (ASSET) and on existing measurement scales in the scientific literature. The GEAM tool provides an integrated environment for carrying out survey-based gender equality audits and monitoring that involves a pre-defined set of recommended questions (GEAM Core) and a database for managing and sharing newly developed or adapted questionnaires.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Higher Education institutions

 

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The present report, prepared within the framework of H2020 GENDERACTION Project, explores the possible intersections between gender and Open Science/Open Innovation, and should be considered as a starting point for stakeholders to reflect on how the two ERA priorities may create reinforcing synergies. The report also underscores the need for further studies and analyses. The report contains data on the situation of Open Science and Open innovation from the gender point of view. The document contains also recommendations. The third and fourth recommendations are related to gender equality assessment in RPOs and RFOs.

Part of interest: See in particular the part on recommendations.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation Business, Intermediaries, Payers

 

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The Gender Equality (GE) Academy Project is developing and implementing a high-quality capacity-building programme on gender equality in research, innovation, and higher education for researchers, managers, administrators, HR managers, and academics staff. The project promotes different kinds of training and capacity-building initiatives (composed of tailor-made training materials) aimed at increasing the skills or deepening the expertise of people involved in implementing measures towards gender equality in their institutions. Among the issues of the training, there are: the definition and implementation of a Gender equality plan; gender bias; recruitment and promotion of women leadership; gender in research content; intersectionality; the role of men; Gender equality plan and RRI; sustainability of Gender equality plan, etc. Among the resources, there is the Deliverable “D2.1 Inventory of key resources” including Area 8 specifically focused on “Setting indicators, monitoring, and evaluation” (Pg. 148-170). Training initiatives, as well as the available resources, can accompany and support the institutional change process and contribute to its sustainability.

Part of interest: The entire website, and in particular the pages Repository, Deliverables, Past training, and Future offer.

Target groups: Policymakers, CSOs, RPOs, Innovation business, intermediaries, Higher education institutions

 

Section E3

Impact assessment and sustainability

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The SDG Impact Assessment Tool is a free online learning tool that visualizes the results from a self-assessment of how an activity, organisation, or innovation affects the SDGs. It aims to stimulate the user to get a better understanding of the complexity of sustainable development and the different aspects of the SDGs and to support the user in prioritizing actions.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: Business Innovation, RPOs, CSOs, Policy Makers

 

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This is a Tool on Impact Management for the Sustainable Development Goals for Business organisations. Access to the Tool requires free registration.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Intermediaries

 

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This is a tool a company can use to measure its impact on its workers, community, environment, and customers. The Tool provides a certification. The use of the Tool foresees three steps: 1 step, assess the impact of the organisation with regard to the following impact areas: governance, workers, community, and environment); step 2: share the results with teams and compare the impact with that of other organisations; step 3: improve the impact by designing a road map, taking into account the answer about the impact of the organisation. The website contains examples and case studies.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Intermediaries

 

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This is a platform set up by the Global Reporting Initiative Standards, aimed at creating a common language for organisations – large or small, private or public – to report on their sustainability impacts in a consistent and credible way. In addition to reporting companies, the standards contained in the platform are highly relevant to many other groups, including investors, policymakers, capital markets, and civil society.

Part of interest: The entire report and in particular the standard.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, CSO, Payers, Policymakers

 

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This is a RRI self-assessment tool set up in the framework of KARIM project. The Karim assessment Matrix helps entrepreneurs and innovators to gain insight into where they are concerning the social, environmental, and economic impact of their companies and how they have organised their processes. Applying it to the research and innovation process(es) of an enterprise, it will allow to know the strengths. Moreover, the areas in which it can make progress are pointed out. This will help innovators to decide the area of improvement. The Matrix foresees four steps: selection of relevant topics; description of the situation; possible improvements; identification of possible obstacles; needed resources. Filling the matrix requires around 4 hours.

Part of interest: The entire tool.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation Business, Start-ups

 

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The report presents a set of preliminary conceptual and practical considerations on the evaluation of the Smart Specialisation policy. It opens a discussion that aims to set the scene for more articulated and detailed reflections. This is one of the official Guides to evaluate RIS3 policies.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Higher Education Institutions, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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The Wheel is a tool of the RIS3 Guide. It presents a system for the synthetic representation of the progress made in drafting/designing a RIS3 that allows condensing a huge amount of information in one visual modality.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Higher Education Institutions, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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This document (SeeRRI project, Deliverable D6.1, 2020) provides information on the design methods for evaluating the SeeRRI project activities and the framework for self-sustaining ecosystems in terms of: Outcomes of the activities initiated in the three territories affiliated to the SeeRRI Project; Societal, democratic, environmental, economic and scientific impacts of activities in the territories; Recommendations on policy and governance structures to facilitate the creation and maintenance of self-sustaining RRI ecosystems.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, CSOs

 

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This is the Deliverable D7.1 of the Transform Project. It provides a first set of instruction and advice on the monitoring and assessment of embedding the principles and practices of RRI – Responsible Research and Innovation – into institutions, policies, and practices of innovation at the regional scale. The project involves itself in processes of innovation, policy-making, and practice in three European regions: Lombardy, Catalonia, and the Brussels-Capital Region.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Intermediaries, Higher education institutions, Payers

 

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This is the first evaluation scheme set up by the TeRRItoria project (Deliverable D6.1.). This scheme is being up-dated and tailored with respect to the content of the five on-going TeRRItoria experiments (TE) of implementation of RRI approach at the territorial level. By bringing together a wide range of stakeholders in the development and implementation of the five experiments, the project intends to address and mitigate territorial R&I challenges through the advancement of “Territorial RRI”. Overall, the internal evaluation of activities is designed to assess the implementation of TE actions/initiatives and their impacts produced throughout the project and to use this knowledge to ensure the long-term sustainability of the experimental activities commenced.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Innovation business, Intermediaries, CSOs, Payers

 

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This is a paper (by Jolyet al., 2015) describing the ASIRPA approach for assessing the socio-economic impact of RPOs through case studies. This approach has been set up and used in the framework of ASIRPA (Socio-Economic Analysis of the Impacts of Public Agricultural Research) project. The cases are theory-based, selected to characterize the diversity of the broader impacts, and standardized to allow the scaling-up of the analysis of the impact to the level of the organisation.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Policymakers, Payers, CSOs, Higher Education Institute, Providers

 

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This is an article (by Patton, 1994) describing, also with examples, the approach of the developmental evaluation, applied to policies, projects, interventions. This is the definition of Developmental evaluation: Evaluation processes and activities that support program, project, product, personnel and/ or organisational development (usually the latter). The evaluator is part of a team whose members collaborate to conceptualize, design, and test new approaches in a long-term, on-going process of continuous improvement, adaptation, and intentional change. The evaluator’s primary function in the team is to elucidate team discussions with evaluative data and logic and to facilitate data-based decision-making in the developmental process.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: Policymakers, RPOs, Higher Education Institutions, Innovation Business, CSOs

 

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This is a paper (by Kok, and Schuit, 2012) describing a new method for assessing and enhancing the impact of health research. Contribution Mapping is inspired by a perspective from social studies of science on how research and knowledge utilisation processes evolve. For each research project that is assessed, a three-phase process map is developed that includes the main actors, activities, and alignment efforts during research formulation, production, and knowledge extension. The approach focuses on the actors involved in, or interacting with, a research project (the linked actors) and the most likely influential users, who are referred to as potential key users.

Part of interest: The entire document.

Target groups: RPOs, Innovation business, Providers, Professionals, CSOs, Policymakers

 

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